The Weekend Moon

moon-bino

   This weekend the waxing Moon will pass by the open star cluster, M-44, the outer planet Jupiter, and the heart of Leo the Lion, the star Regulus. M-44, or the Beehive Cluster, is an open star cluster comprised of about 1000 stars, and located at a distance of around 600 light years from the Earth. On the evening of the 25th the three will all fit, more or less, within the field of view of 7×50 binoculars – as this graphic shows.
   The slide show below shows the sky at 10 pm CDT for the next three evenings, starting with Saturday the 25th.
   
   

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Caution: Objects viewed with an optical aid are further than they appear.
Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for more observing information for this month.

Follow the Moon

   Thursday morning I had the great pleasure to visit with the 4th grade class of Mrs. Johnson at Prairie View Elementary. We talked and modeled Moon phases and then had a great back and forth about a lot of things celestial ranging from the Cat’s Eye nebulae, the ‘lady in the Moon, Newton’s laws of motion, astronauts, and much more. So this set of graphics below is for the students in Mrs, Johnson, and of course everyone else!
   Over the next several evenings (2 May; 3 May; 4 May; 5 May; 6 May)the waxing Moon will work its way eastward and as it does so the Moon will pass by some interesting objects. Since the Moon will be in its waxing crescent phases its reflected sunlight should not interfere too much with binocular and naked eye observing. The graphics in the slide show were done with the simulated sky set for the same time, 9 pm CDT (2 UT), starting with 2 May and ending with 6 May, the day before first quarter phase.

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Caution: Objects viewed with an optical aid are further than they appear.
   Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for more observing information for this month.

FD 2014

   Happy New Year to all. For those who are wondering FD 2014 is a command used in the Turtle Graphics language of the Logo programming language – circa mid-1980’s or so. FD is the ‘forward’ command and whatever number that follows is how many steps (pixels) the turtle would move on the screen. My use of it here was a familiar New Year greeting for Logo users back then. Anyway, this has been a decent year despite everything there were actually good things that happened during this past year. And I hope that whatever one’s situation happens to be that 2014 will be a forward year rather than whatever a backward year is.
2013year-data map   Thank you all for reading my posts. How many you ask? Well at the risk of tooting my own horn (toot-toot) this past year I wrote 225 new posts and Bob’s-Spaces had 39,294 page views, with the best day reaching 2,709 views. Since last January 1 there have been 42,203 blocked spams! Click on the map graphic to see a world map showing where Bob’s-Spaces was not read. The white or uncolored places)

I offer the following as a not too serious way to ease into the New Year.

   Here is an example of Logo using the idea of recursion (repeating the same thing) for a New Year’s resolution:
To Live
Inhale
Exhale
To Live

So, where would you park the Space Shuttle??

The consequences of a Black Hole.

   Tomorrow, New Year’s Day, includes a New Moon: So as a way to ‘ring’ in the new year and hopefully not offend anyone, you will find below some of the Moon cartoons I have collected over the years and more than likely used in my classes! Apparently I was into cows at one point!!

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new year

   
   
   
Caution: Objects viewed with an optical aid are further than they appear.
   Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for more observing information for this month.

September Perigee Moon

Click on image to see it full size.

Click on image to see it full size.

   Our Moon orbits around the Sun with the Earth and from our perspective on the Earth the Moon appears to circle the Earth each month. The Moon also has a slightly elliptical-shaped orbit allowing for the Moon to have a furthest (apogee) and closest (perigee) distances from the Earth each month. This month the 11 days old waxing Gibbous Moon reaches perigee today, 15 September, and will more or less be at a distance of 28.8 Earth diameters (366,992.0 km or 228,038.4 miles)

   
   
   Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for more observing information for this month.

Scorpion Misses Moon!

Click on image to see full size.

Click on image to see full size.

   This evening the 6.7 day old waxing crescent Moon will be within a few degrees from the reddish star Antares, the heart of Scorpius the Scorpion. Even though the Moon looks like it is first quarter, and for some depending on the time zone it already is, the Moon is not at first quarter phase for the time zone my writing radiates from until around 1:30 am CDT tomorrow morning. “Just sayin'”

   
   
   Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for more observing information for this month.

A Well Balanced Moon

10sep-moon   This evening the 5.6 day old waxing crescent Moon is well-balanced albeit just below the fulcrum of Libra the Scales. The Moon seems poised as if about to be caught in the outstretched pincers of Scorpius the Scorpion.

   
   
   
   
   Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for more observing information for this month.

Moon – Saturn Conjunction

Click on image to see full size.

Click on image to see full size.

   This evening the 4.5 day old waxing crescent Moon will be about 4 degrees from the planet Saturn. Close enough such that both will fit within the field of view of typical binoculars.

   Before sunrise look east to see that Mars is still close to the Beehive Cluster and still within the field of view of binoculars.

   
   
   Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for more observing information for this month.

August Perigee Moon

Click on image to see it full size

Click on image to see it full size

   Our Moon orbits around the Sun with the Earth and from our perspective on the Earth the Moon appears to circle the Earth each month. The Moon also has a slightly elliptical-shaped orbit allowing for the Moon to have a furthest (apogee) and closest (perigee) distances from the Earth each month. This month the 13.69 days old waxing Gibbous Moon reaches perigee today, 19 August, and will more or less be at a distance of 28.2 Earth diameters (360,065.0 km or 223,734.0 miles).

   
   
   
   
   
   Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for more observing information.

Moon and Venus Conjunction

Click on this image to see it full size.

Click on this image to see it full size.

   This evening the waxing crescent Moon will be near the brightly shining planet Venus.
   If the weather cooperates this evening I will be taking pictures of the Moon and Venus from where the banner picture was taken, at the Windy Point overlook on Mt. Lemmon. Here’s hoping! So far this week the skies around Tucson have been partly or mostly overcast.
   Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for more observing information.