Moon on the Move

   Over the course of the next week or so the Moon will be moving eastward across the evening skies as it waxes from crescent toward full Phase on September 1st. This series of graphics shows the sky at 9:00 pm CDT daily until August 30th. Use the graphics as a guide to locating some of the stars near the path the Moon follows, as well as the evenings when the Moon is in conjunction with Jupiter, then Saturn.


   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.


Also Follow me and other great resources at Feedspot.

There’s a Comet in my Hair!

   Here’s perhaps a chance to catch an interesting picture of the comet. Over the southwestern horizon Comet 2020 F3 (NEOWISE) may still be visible although its apparent magnitude (5.50) and its tail have been steadily decreasing.

   The comet is currently passing by a small y-shaped group of stars (naked-eye view) that are part of the constellation Coma Berenices over the nights of Wednesday July 29th and Thursday July 30th. Both the comet and the stars will be within the field of view of binoculars as the comet passes by the stars.

   The stars of the small constellation Coma Berenices represent the hair cut from Berenice, an Egyptian Queen, whose hair was a religious offering as a bargain for her husband to return safely from war.
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
    And, unmistakable over the eastern horizon is the Moon, and just rising the planets Jupiter and Saturn.

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.


Also Follow me and other great resources at

June Moon at Perigee

   Our Moon reaches perigee, (closest to Earth), for this orbit, on Tuesday June 30th. At that time the Moon will be at a distance of 28.92 Earth diameters, 229,259 miles (368,958 km) from the Earth.

   On the day of the perigee Moon the 10-day old waxing gibbous Moon will be over the southeastern horizon around mid-evening.

   Does our Moon actually go around the Earth as this graphic shows? From our perspective on the Earth the Moon appears to circle around the Earth. However, in reality, the Moon orbits the Sun together with the Earth*
   *Click here to read my 2006 Scope on the Sky column “The Real Shape of the Moon’s Orbit”. (PDF)

   
   
   
   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to go to bobs-spaces.


Also Follow me and other great resources at Feedspot.

Virgo Spikes the Moon

   Our Moon, after traversing the boundaries of the constellation Leo the Lion, will then do a similiar crossing of the constellation Virgo the Harvest Maiden. Roughly midway across Virgo is the bright blue-white star Spica. From mythologies the star Spica represents a harvested bundle of grasses, maybe wheat or oats.
   On the evening of June 28th the Moon will be about 7o to the west from Spica, and the next evening, June 29th the Moon will about 9-10o to the east from Spica.

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.


Also Follow me and other great resources at Feedspot.

Moon – Antares Conjunction

   Saturday morning May 9th the 16-day old waning gibbous Moon will be about 6-7o from the heart of Scorpius the Scorpion, the reddish star Antares.
   Joining the waning gibbous Moon will be the several of the visible planets arranged west to east starting with Jupiter, then Saturn, and Mars further east. The Dwarf Planet Ceres is also part of the planet spread but at 8th magnitude Ceres would require binoculars to see.

   
   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.


Also Follow me and other great resources at Feedspot.

Moon – Spica Conjunction

   Tuesday evening May 5th the 12-day old waxing gibbous Moon will be about 7o from the blue-white star Spica in the constellation Virgo the Harvest Maiden.

   In illustrations of Virgo the star Spica represents a bundle of grasses (wheat, oats) held in her left hand.

   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.


Also Follow me and other great resources at Feedspot.

The Moon and the Lion

   Saturday April 4th the 11.5-day old waxing gibbous Moon will be high above the southern horizon at sunset local time and the Moon will be about 4-5o from the heart of Leo the Lion, the star Regulus.

   If your skies are clear look toward the west for Venus to be very close, on the east side, of the open star cluster the Pleiades. Both will easily fit within the field of view of binoculars or a telescope with a low-magnification eyepiece.

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.


Also Follow me and other great resources at Feedspot.

March Moon at Ascending Node

   Late Wednesday evening March 4th the 10.5-day old waxing gibbous Moon will be crossing the plane of the ecliptic moving north. This is known as the ascending node, one of two intersections the Moon’s orbital path has with the ecliptic. The ecliptic is actually the Earth’s orbit, and the Moon’s orbit is inclined about 6o from the ecliptic. So there are two node intersections, the ascending and descending nodes.

   While the Moon is at its ascending node the Moon is coincidentally also at its northernmost declination of 23.4o North of the Celestial Equator as this graphic is showing. 

   Does our Moon actually go around the Earth as many graphics show? From our perspective on the Earth the Moon appears to circle around the Earth. However, in reality, the Moon orbits the Sun together with the Earth*
*Click here to read my 2006 Scope on the Sky column “The Real Shape of the Moon’s Orbit”. (PDF)

   
   

   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.


Also Follow me and other great resources at Feedspot.

Taurus Head-Butts the Moon!

   Monday evening February 3rd the 10-day old waxing gibbous Moon will be about 3-4o from the reddish star Aldebaran in Taurus the Bull. Aldebaran, in mythology, represents the ‘angry eye’ of the Bull. Aldebaran is also the brightest star in the v-shaped Hyades open star cluster. Nearby is another open star cluster, the Pleiades, most observable as a small dipper-shape grouping of stars.

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.


Also Follow me and other great resources at Feedspot.

Waxing Gibbous Moon Near Aldebaran

   Tuesday evening January 7th the 13-day old waxing gibbous Moon will be about 3-4o from the reddish star Aldebaran. Aldebaran is known as the ‘angry’ red eye of the constellation pattern Taurus the Bull.

    Aldebaran is located at one end of a v-shaped cluster of stars making up the face of the Bull. This group of stars are all part of an open star cluster known as the Hyades. They are one of two naked-eye visible open star clusters within the boundaries of the constellation. The other one is the little dipper-shaped group known as the Pleiades.

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.


Also Follow me and other great resources at Feedspot.