ISS Last Night

   Last evening was my first opportunity to see the ISS in at least a month so I quickly set up my camera aiming it toward Venus and Mars. However my aim was off by quite a bit so I hurriedly readjusted the camera, 3 times, to capture these pictures. All were taken with ISO 800; F5; 18mm; 2.5 second. Pictures were stacked, merged, using Starstax.

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.

Moon Conjunction with Mars and Venus

31jan-bino   Wednesday February 1st the 4-day old waxing crescent Moon will be near the planets Mars and Venus as this simulated view with 10×50 binoculars shows.

   These two graphics show the sky as viewed from Quito Ecuador at 0o latitude, and my home latitude of approximately 40o North. 


   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.

Jupiter at Quadrature ——— Venus at Elongation

   Thursday January 12th the gas giant planet Jupiter reaches the point along its orbit around the Sun where Jupiter would be described as being at western quadrature. It is at a 90o angle relative to the Earth and the Sun.
   Also on this day the inner planet Venus reaches a point in its orbit known as eastern elongation. This puts Venus at somewhere around a 90o angle relative to the Earth and the Sun when viewed looking down from above the solar system but Venus is on the other side of the Sun from where Uranus is currently located.
   In terms of elongation Venus is 47.2o to the east of the Sun. In terms of viewing angle you are the point of a triangle with Venus at the left base corner and the Sun at the right base corner. The angle between the Sun and Venus is the elongation angle, and at 47.2o Venus sets around 3 hours after sunset as its seting motion or speed is (15o per hour based on Earth rotation rate.
   Where is Jupiter currently? Jupiter rises around midnight local time and is located high above the southern horizon at sunrise local time near the blue-white star Spica in Virgo the Harvest Maiden.
   And Venus? Can’t miss this planet as it is the brighest stellar object over the western horizon at sunset.
   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.

Moon Moons Uranus

   Thursday January 5th the just past first quarter Moon, a waxing gibbous Moon, is close to the outer planet Uranus, and also two of the Dwarf Planets. But close only in the sense that the three are in the same direction, or line of sight. Uranus as the next-to-last outermost of the 8 planets is 19.8 Au and has an apparent magnitude of 5.8. Ceres and Eris, while both are Dwarf Planets, are at very nearly the opposite ends of the solar system. Ceres is within the asteroid belts at a distance of 2.5 AU and has an apparent magnitude of 7.64. Eris, on the other hand is 96 AU from the Earth and has an apparent magnitude of 18.6.

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.

Moon Near Venus


   Sunday evening January 1st the 4-day old thin waxing crescent Moon will be within 5o to the west (right) from the inner planet Venus.

   Below is a picture of the Moon and Venus through the clouds this evening.
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.

Mars Moves Into the New Year

   Over the next several days Mars will catch up with and then pass by Neptune coming within less than 0.5o on December 31st. Mars moves at a daily rate of about 0.5o while Neptune moves about 0.006o each day. If you were on Mars observing Neptune you would see Neptune begin its retrograde motion. Interestingly from here on Earth Neptune has just ended its retrograde motion. It’s all relative as somebody probably said.
   Both planets will be above the southwestern at sunset local time with only Mars being visible without the use of an optical aid.
   Comet 45P/Honda-Mrkos-Pajdušáková may be bright enough to be visible with binoculars and certainly with a telescope, and definitely should make for an interesting picture with the waxing crescent Moon nearby.
   
   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.

ISS, Mars, Venus, and Clouds

   It was the best of times, no actually it kind’ve sucked as the somewhat clear skies started to cloud over! I had plans for catching the ISS as its orbit over my part of the world took it between Venus and Mars as it traversed my skies from west to southeast this evening (20 December). With some image processing I was able to tweak out the ISS in most of the 26 images stacked to make one of pictures you see below. The other one…colorful.


   Camera settings were 18mm; ISO 800; F6.0; 3.2 sec. Pictures stacked using StarStaX. StarStaX is available as Freeware for Mac OS X, Windows and Linux.

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.