Orion, Batter Up!

   Late evening Tuesday March 3rd the 9.5-day old waxing gibbous Moon will be near the stars that make up the weapon held in Orion’s upraised right arm. Sort of looks like Orion is swinging a baseball bat at the Moon. And given the shape of the Moon’s orbit the pitch must be a curve ball!

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.


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Waning Crescent Moon and Open Star Clusters

   Sunday morning June 30th, before sunrise local time, look for a thin 27-day old waning crescent Moon to be close to the two open star clusters in Taurus the Bull, the Pleiades and the Hyades. The Pleiades are about 9-10o west, or above, the Moon, while the v-shaped Hyades and the Moon will all fit within the field of view of binoculars.

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.


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Mars and Two Open Clusters

   Monday evening April 1st the planet Mars was within about 3o from the open star cluster the Pleiades and about 8-9o from the open star cluster the Hyades. These two open star clusters are part of the constellation Taurus the Bull with the v-shaped Hyades and its reddish star Aldebaran making up the Bull’s face, and the ‘small dipper-shaped’ Pleiades are located along the Bull’s shoulder.

   From mythology it has been told that Orion and Taurus are engaged in a battle. Orion with a shield held up against the charging bull, and the anger of the bull indicated by its red eye, the star Aldebaran.

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.


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Moon – Aldebaran Conjunction

   Tuesday evening March 12th the 6-day old waxing crescent Moon will be about 4o from the reddish star Aldebaran in the constellation Taurus the Bull. Aldebaran is also the brightest in the open star cluster the Hyades, a v-shaped appearing group of stars making the face of Taurus. Both the Moon and the v-shape of the Hyades should fit nicely within the field of view of 7×50 binoculars.

    Aldebaran, from mythology, represents the ‘angry eye’ of the bull as it charges toward Orion.

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.


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Moon in a Face-Off with Taurus


   Sunday September 30th the 20-day old waning gibbous Moon will be within 1-2o from the reddish star Aldebaran in the open star cluster the Hyades. The Hyades are a v-shaped group of stars making up the face of Taurus the Bull.
Aldebaran is at the tip of one of the
lines making up the v-shape and, with its reddish color, represents the ‘angry eye’ of the Bull.
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.


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Moon Traverses Taurus


   Wednesday and Thursday evenings March 21st and 22nd the waxing crescent Moon will pass across the constellation of Taurus the Bull. It will first be several degrees from the open star cluster the Pleiades and then the next day the Moon will be within 1-2o from the reddish star Aldebaran and the open star cluster the Hyades. The latter should prove to be a striking sight through binoculars.

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.

Taurus Eyes the Moon

   Saturday evening December 30th the 13-day old waxing gibbous Moon will be 1-2o from the reddish star Aldebaran. The star is often described as representing the angry eye of Taurus the Bull. Regardless Aldebaran is at one end of a v-shaped group of stars that make-up the face of Taurus. These stars are part of an open star cluster, the Hyades, consisting of several hundreds of stars located about 150 light years from the Earth.

   About 10o from the Hyades, on the shoulder of Taurus, is another well-known open star cluster – the Pleiades. This is a cluster of approximately 1,000 stars located at a distance of 400-450 light years. Easily seen with the naked-eye several of the brightest stars form a small dipper-shape.
   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.