An Astro 2fer

   The title may be somewhat of a U.S.A. expression but it simply means there are two Astronomy events I am writing about and have combined them into one posting. So around sunset local time on Wednesday May 3rd the waxing, or very nearly first quarter Moon, will be within a few degrees from the star Regulus in Leo the Lion. While over the western horizon the ‘Red Planet’ Mars is near the stars making up the face of Taurus the Bull – the Hyades open star cluster.


   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.

Sun Not in Taurus

April 19th  According to the pseudoscience of astrology the Sun enters the constellation of Taurus the Bull on Wednday April 19th. When in fact the actual position of the Sun on the 19th is still within the boundary of the constellation of Aries the Ram, as this graphic shows. Actually the Sun had just entered Aries the day before on April 18th.

   Read a little more about how astrology has the Sun incorrectly placed in a previous blog, and in another blog discussing the effects of precession.
   
   
   
   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.

Bulls Eye? Bull’s Nose!

   Tuesday morning November 15th the just past full Moon, the waning gibbous Moon, will appear to be poking Taurus the Bull on the Nose. Ignore the illustration and this will be an interesting binocular viewing opportunity as the Moon will be within a few degrees from the reddish star Aldebaran in the V-shaped face of the Bull.
   Depending on your viewing location you may see the Moon come within 0.45o from Aldebaran. The closest approach will be at 17 UT, (11 am CST).

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.

Moon Passes the Hyades

   Over the next couple of nights or early mornings the waning gibbous Moon will pass across the stars of the Hyades, a v-shaped open star cluster that makes up the face of Taurus the Bull. Depending on your geographical location you may see the Moon either pass very closely to the reddish star Aldebaran.
    From parts of Eastern Africa, Middle East, and South Asia the waning Gibbous Moon will be within 0.2o from Aldebaran.
   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to go to bobs-spaces.

Get a Jump on Time – Spring Forward

daylight-clipart-443177-royalty-free-rf-clip-art-illustration-of-a-cartoon-man-on-a-daylight-savings-clock
   Sometime tonight or officially Sunday morning clocks in most of the United States of America will be set one hour forward, or “Spring Forward”, putting the U.S.A. on Daylight Saving Time. For you astronomical types, and you know who you are, I live at approximately 94oW, in the Central Time Zone so springing forward for me is a change from UT-6 to UT-5.
   
   
   
   You can learn a lot about time and calendars at the Time and Date web site.


   Sunday evening, March 13th, the waxing crescent Moon will be near two open star clusters, the Pleiades and the Hyades, both part of the constellation Taurus the Bull.

   
   
   
   

Caution: Objects viewed with an optical aid are further than they appear.
Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for more observing information for this month.

Moon Near Aldebaran


   Tuesday evening January 19th the 10-day old waxing gibbous Moon will pass within about 1o from the reddish star Aldebaran in Taurus the Bull. Aldebaran is the brightest of the stars in Taurus, and is one of the end stars in the v-shaped open star cluster known as the Hyades.
   For some parts of the world the Moon will occult or pass in front of Aldebaran. jan19-binoHowever from my location the Moon will be right around 1o from Aldebaran, making at the least for interesting binocular viewing, or photographing. Unfortunately my weather forecast for Tuesday evening includes several inches of snow.
   The Moon rises around 2 pm local time and is well above the horizon by the time it gets dark.

   
   
   
   

Caution: Objects viewed with an optical aid are further than they appear.
Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for more observing information for this month.

Ear is the Moon!

21apr-bino   Tuesday evening April 21st direct your eyes toward the west and the setting Moon. The Moon, looking as if it were stuck in the ear of Taurus the Bull, is in its waxing stage and is approximately 3.5 days old. Within a few degrees from the thin Moon is the reddish star Aldebaran. This star, in mythology, represents the ‘angry eye’ of Taurus the Bull. Aldebaran looks like it belongs to the v-shaped open star cluster that makes up the face of the Bull. These are the Hyades, a group of stars that are actually much further from the Earth than is the star Aldebaran.
   Just in case you are wondering, that much brighter star-like object a few degrees from the Moon and Aldebaran is the inner planet Venus.

   
   
   
   
Caution: Objects viewed with an optical aid are further than they appear.
Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for more observing information for this month.