Moon and Star Clusters

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   Before sunrise on Friday morning 30 August look toward the east for the group of stars and constellations making up a familiar part of the northern hemisphere winter skies. Part of this group, temporarily, is the waning crescent Moon as it works its way eastward. The Moon will be within the field of view of 7×50 binoculars from two open star clusters. M-35 is an open star cluster that is approximately 2800 light years distant and contains several hundred stars shining with a combined brightness of around 5th-6th magnitude.
   Just one-half degree from M-35 is the much fainter star cluster NGC-2158.
Click on image to see full size

Click on image to see full size.

This is a much smaller and fainter group of stars that are estimated to be around 11,000 light years distant and has an apparent magnitude of between 8 and 9.
   Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for more observing information.