Saturn at East Quadrature-2015

   Friday August 21st the position of the planet Saturn with respect to the Earth and the Sun places this ringed planet at what is called eastern quadrature. Saturn is at a 90 degree angle from us as this graphic shows. Think first quarter Moon as that is a fair comparison of the relative positions. At this position Saturn follows the Sun across the sky from east to west as the Earth is rotating, meaning that Saturn rises after the Sun and sets after the Sun.

   Where is Saturn now? Saturn is west (to the right) from the planet Saturn and near the eastern side of the constellation Libra the Scales.

Learn a little (or a lot) more about Saturn by visiting the Cassini at Saturn mission web site.
Click here to go to the Cassini Mission web site.
Click here to go to the Cassini Mission Flyby web page to see when the next Saturn satellite flyby will be.

   This is a short 5 minute video I made as part of a live musical performance called “Orbit” that I was part of in May 2011. This is a piece from the much longer tour of the solar system performance and video and shows Saturn and some of its moons as viewed from the Cassini spacecraft that month.

   
   
   
   

Caution: Objects viewed with an optical aid are further than they appear.
Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for more observing information for this month.

Scorpius Grabs the Moon!

scorpius-moon-ani   Monday September 1st the nearly first quarter Moon will be rising within the clutches of Scorpius the Scorpion as the banner graphic shows.
   When looking for or recognizing the star pattern for Scorpius most look for what could be described as the English letter J, or as I tell my younger students a ‘lazy J’.

Click on graphic to see it full size.

Click on graphic to see it full size.

   This part of the northern hemisphere late summer skies is always a treat to observe especially if the skies are dark enough to see the Milky Way. If you can find the teapot-shaped asterism for Sagittarius then look for the pour spot on the right side. Under dark skies the Milky Way looks like steam rising from the teapot. Look just off to the right, west, from the pour spout and you are looking toward the center of our galaxy, some 27,000 light years away. Here is an infrared image of the galaxy center from NASA’s 2MASS mission.

   
   
   
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Caution: Objects viewed with an optical aid are further than they appear.
   Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for more observing information for this month.

A Well Balanced Moon

10sep-moon   This evening the 5.6 day old waxing crescent Moon is well-balanced albeit just below the fulcrum of Libra the Scales. The Moon seems poised as if about to be caught in the outstretched pincers of Scorpius the Scorpion.

   
   
   
   
   Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for more observing information for this month.