Dance of the Planets – 20 Sep. Venus / Regulus Conjunction

   This morning the inner planet Venus and the ‘heart of the lion’, the star Regulus were about 0.5o from each other. Lower near the horizon and emerging from the mornning cloud layer is the other inner planet Mercury, and just above and fainter the planet Mars.
   Camera particulars: Canon Rebel T7i; 27 mm; ISO-800; f/5.6; 8 sec.

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.

Dance of the Planets – Sep. 20

   The ‘dancing’ continues.
   Wednesday morning September 20th the inner planet Venus and the star Regulus will be about 0.5 o from each other in a very close conjunction. Venus is shining at an apparent magnitude of 3.9 while Regulus, the ‘heart of the lion’ has an apparent magnitude of 1.4. Both will fit within the field of view of binoculars as well as a low power or wide-field telescope eyepiece.
   Look a bit lower toward the horizon for two more planets, the innermost planet Mercury, and the ‘Red Planet’ Mars.

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.

Dance of the Planets-Sep. 18

   The ‘dancing’ continues.
   Monday morning September 18th there will be a ‘solar system cluster’ (for lack of another term!), in the hour or so before the Sun rises.
   Look eastward for three planets (Venus, Mars, Mercury), the 27.5-day old thin waning crescent Moon, and the star Regulus in the constellation Leo the Lion.
   The Moon is situated between Venus and Mars and Mercury such that you are able to see the Moon and Venus within one field of view with binoculars, and by shifting your view lower then be able to see the Moon with Mars and Mercury within that field of view.

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.

September Moon at Ascending Node

   Sunday September 17th the waning crescent Moon will be crossing the plane of the ecliptic moving north relative to the ecliptic. This is known as the ascending node, one of two intersections the Moon’s orbital path has with the ecliptic. The ecliptic is actually the Earth’s orbit and the Moon’s orbit is inclined about 6o from the ecliptic. So there are two node intersections, the ascending and descending nodes.

   On September 17th the thin 26.5-day old waning crescent Moon will be within the constellation of Leo the Lion. The Moon will be located about 6o from Venus, and about 9o from the heart of the Lion, the star Regulus. A few more degrees further east from Venus and Regulus (below, as they rise in the morning), is the ‘Red Planet’ Mars, and nearby is the innermost planet Mercury.
   These two planets are close enough for both to be seen in the field of view of binoculars.

   Does our Moon actually go around the Earth as many graphics show? From our perspective on the Earth the Moon appears to circle around the Earth. However, in reality, the Moon orbits the Sun together with the Earth*

*Click here to read my 2006 Scope on the Sky column “The Real Shape of the Moon’s Orbit”. (PDF)

Read this very informative article about the Earth-Moon system and their orbital motions, written by Joe Hanson. “Do We Orbit the Moon?”

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.

Dance of the Planets: 9 Sep. – Mercury & Regulus Conjunction

   This morning I set up my camera looking eastward along Highway 50. With city lights behind me, ‘Auto Row’ down the road, and a 19-day old waning gibbous Moon high over my right shoulder the sky was not really that dark. However pictures of visible planets and stars do not always have to be under dark skies or good seeing conditions. Adding to that were the low clouds along the horizon.
   This graphic shows the sky I had plans for imaging this morning, including Dwarf Planet Ceres near Pollux in the Gemini Twins. Plans had been to capture Mercury in conjunction with the star Regulus (check), and also Mars which this morning was closer to the horizon below Mercury (no check!). In the next few days Mars will be higher and easier to include in the group picture. Higher above the horizon and very bright with a -3.95 apparent magnitude was Venus.

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.

Dance of the Planets

   This month the excitement (speaking for myself!) with planet watching shifts to the morning skies. The two inner planets Mercury and Venus and one outer planet, Mars, have several conjunctions with one another and the star Regulus in Leo the Lion throughout this month.
   This animated graphic is set for 1-day intervals starting with September 8th and ending on the 30th.

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.

Teacher Eclipse Pictures

   Here is a collection of pictures and comments from Science Teacher members of the NSTA (National Science Teachers Association) who viewed the August 21st total solar eclipse from different locations across the United States of America. The State where the picture(s) was/were taken is abbreviated to be part of the picture name – so you could scroll down to the bottom of the picture to see that.
   The caption below a picture starts the sequence of pictures from each teacher. Clicking on any picture will open it into a slide show where you can move forward or backward through the various pictures.
   From Ryan Westberry: Here’s a video I made after watching the totality in Wyoming at Green River Lakes just off the center line. I sent my drone up really high to capture the landscape while also filming our reactions on the surface- and set it all to music.
I did edit the language in the beginning of totality (overcome by that moment) but there are some “Oh S^*t” toward the end that need to be known if anyone plans on showing it. (I’m not promoting that.) I’m just wanting to share in the emotion (I was literally shaking and had tears of joy) and magnitude of watching the event and the love of the science. 🙂

   Here is one of the 360o videos I made while the school yard was filling up with families and the students.

   If you are wondering what do with any eclipse glasses perhaps donate them to the Eclipse Glasses Donation Program – organized by Astronomers Without Borders.

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.