Waxing Gibbous Moon Near Aldebaran

   Tuesday evening January 7th the 13-day old waxing gibbous Moon will be about 3-4o from the reddish star Aldebaran. Aldebaran is known as the ‘angry’ red eye of the constellation pattern Taurus the Bull.

    Aldebaran is located at one end of a v-shaped cluster of stars making up the face of the Bull. This group of stars are all part of an open star cluster known as the Hyades. They are one of two naked-eye visible open star clusters within the boundaries of the constellation. The other one is the little dipper-shaped group known as the Pleiades.

   
   
   

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Waning Gibbous Moon Near the Pleiades

   Late Wednesday night September 18th the 20-day old waning gibbous Moon will be rising with the stars making up the small dipper-shaped asterism known as the Pleiades. The Moon will be about 10o to the west from the Pleiades.

   
   
   

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Waning Crescent Moon and Open Star Clusters

   Sunday morning June 30th, before sunrise local time, look for a thin 27-day old waning crescent Moon to be close to the two open star clusters in Taurus the Bull, the Pleiades and the Hyades. The Pleiades are about 9-10o west, or above, the Moon, while the v-shaped Hyades and the Moon will all fit within the field of view of binoculars.

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.


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Mars – Pleiades Conjunction

click on graphic to see it larger   Sunday March 31st the planet Mars will be 3-4o from the open star cluster the Pleiades allowing both to fit within the field of view of binoculars. For the next several days Mars will pass the Pleiades as Mars moves eastward against the apparent daily westward motion of the stars in the background resulting from the Earth’s revolution around the Sun.

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.


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Moon and the Hyades

   Wednesday and Thursday January 16th and the 17th the waning gibbous Moon will be passing past the open star cluster the Hyades and the reddish star Aldebaran. This is a v-shaped group of stars that make up the face of Taurus the Bull. The Hyades is one of two open star clusters in the constellation Taurus. The other is a small dipper-shaped group of stars, the Pleiades, located on the shoulder of Taurus.

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.


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Moon Traverses Taurus


   Wednesday and Thursday evenings March 21st and 22nd the waxing crescent Moon will pass across the constellation of Taurus the Bull. It will first be several degrees from the open star cluster the Pleiades and then the next day the Moon will be within 1-2o from the reddish star Aldebaran and the open star cluster the Hyades. The latter should prove to be a striking sight through binoculars.

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.

Taurus Takes It On The Chin!


   Friday evening March 31st the 4-day old waxing crescent Moon will be about 4o from the reddish star Aldebaran in the open star cluster The Hyades. This open star cluster has a noticeable v-shape and from mythology the v-shape is the face of Taurus the Bull. Over the course of several hours as the Moon continues moving eastward along its orbit the Moon will pass across the v-shape and will be less than one-half degree from Aldebaran.
   
   
   
click on animated graphic to see it larger
   From my longitude this part of the sky will have set but observers in parts of north Africa, India, and that part of the world may be able to see an occultation of Aldebaran by the Moon. This animated graphic shows the Moon’s motion from 9 pm CDT 31 March to 5 am CDT 1 April (2 UT 1 April to 9 UT 1 April).
   
   
   
   
   

   The point of the v-shape is the bull’s nose while the two stars at the open end, Aldebaran and Epsilon Taurus mark the bull’s eyes. To the right, west, from the Moon is another open star cluster The Pleiades.

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.