A Lunar Eclipse and 2 Planet Conjunction

   Our Moon reaches full phase on July 5th and will be rising around sunset local time. Two of the giant outer planets, Jupiter and Saturn will be passed by the Moon over a two day period. On the 5th the full Moon will be about 6-7o to the west from Jupiter. The next day, July 6th, the waning gibbous Moon will have passed the two planets and the Moon will about 1-2o from Saturn. Both days should prove to be ‘binocular-worthy’ with the morning of the 6th having the Moon the closest to the planets.
   There will also be a partial penumbral lunar eclipse however this type of eclipse has the Moon passing through the faint outer shadow cast by the Earth. Even a total penumbral lunar eclipse is barely noticeable so as a partial do not expect to see much change in the Moon’s brightness.

   
   
   

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Penumbral Lunar Eclipse

penumbral-eclipse-ani   At 17:45 UT (12:45 am CDT) Friday June 5th the full Moon will start passing through the Earth’s shadow setting up the condition for a lunar eclipse. Approximately 24 hours later the just past full Moon will be at its descending node, the orbital point where the Moon’s inclined orbit crosses, or intersects the Earth’s orbit.
   This penumbral lunar eclipse will not be visible from North and South America.
   Click here to go to the Hermit Eclipse web site for an interactive map showing where this eclipse will occur.

   
   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.


Also Follow me and other great resources at Feedspot.”

Penumbral Lunar Eclipse

penumbral-eclipse-ani
   At 9:39 UT (4:39 am CDT) Wednesday March 23rd the full Moon will start passing through the Earth’s shadow setting up the condition for a lunar eclipse. Approximately 24 hours previously the Moon was at its ascending node but since the time for full Moon was about 24 hours after the node crossing the Moon will only pass through the Earth’s fainter outer shadow, the penumbra.
   A penumbral eclipse is not nearly as easily seen nor as spectacular as a partial or total lunar eclipse when the Moon passes through the darker inner shadow – the umbra. The fainter outer shadow, the penumbra, barely darkens the appearance of the full Moon.
   That’s Jupiter just to the left from the Moon.
   Learn more about this eclipse from the Hermit Eclipse web site.

   
   
   

Caution: Objects viewed with an optical aid are further than they appear.
Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for more observing information for this month.

Penumbral Lunar Eclipse

Click on graphic to see it full size.

Click on graphic to see it full size.

   This Friday, 18 October, the full Moon will pass through the outer and fainter part of the Earth’s shadow in what is known as a Penumbral Lunar Eclipse. This is not a total eclipse where the whole Moon passes through the Earth’s shadow, nor is this eclipse one that will darken the Moon as if the Moon had passed through the darker umbral shadow. However about 3/4’s of the Moon will be within the penumbra and so around the time of mid-eclipse the Moon should be less bright enough (dimmer but not darker if that makes any sense) for an observer to notice the eclipse.
Mid-Eclipse

Mid-Eclipse

   The timing for the eclipse will be such that for all of Africa and most of western Europe the full Moon will have already risen before the eclipse begins. From North and South America the eclipse will start before the Moon rises. From my location at 94oW, in the Midwest United States, the Moon will be at mid-eclipse shortly after the Moon rises as these two graphics show.

Eclipse Starts:
21:50 UT (4:50 pm CDT)
Mid-Eclipse:
23:50 UT (6:50 pm CDT)
Eclipse Ends:
01:50 UT (8:50 pm CDT)

Click here for additional information about this penumbral lunar eclipse from the NASA eclipses web site.As of this morning this NASA web site, and all other NASA as well as U.S. government web sites are again available.

   
   
   Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for more observing information for this month.