When the Moon Hits Your Eye

Thursday evening October 17th look for the 19-day old waning gibbous Moon to be rising with the stars of the open star cluster the Hyades. The Moon will be about 3-4o from the reddish star Aldebaran. Aldebaran represents the ‘angry eye’ of Taurus the Bull, and is at the end of the v-shaped asterism, the Hyades.

   
   
   

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Moon in Conjunction with Uranus

   Wednesday October 16th the 18-day old waxing gibbous Moon will rise in the east near the two open star clusters in the constellation of Taurus the Bull. These are the Hyades, a v-shaped asterism making up the face of the Bull, and the Pleiades (aka the 7 Sisters) a small dipper-shaped group of stars on the shoulder of the Bull.

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.


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Waning Gibbous Moon Near the Hyades

   Late Thursday night September 19th or very early Thursday morning September 20th the 22-day old waning gibbous Moon will be rising with the stars making up the v-shaped face of Taurus the Bull. These are the Hyades. The point of the v-shape is the nose of the bull while at the opposite ends are the eyes. Most noticeably is the reddish star Aldebaran, which from the mythology is the Bull’s ‘angry eye’.

   The Moon will be about 4-5o to the west from Aldebaran and will may occult some of the stars making up the Hyades. At sunrise local time the Moon will be over the southern horizon and then sets around midday or early afternoon.

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.


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Waning Gibbous Moon Near the Pleiades

   Late Wednesday night September 18th the 20-day old waning gibbous Moon will be rising with the stars making up the small dipper-shaped asterism known as the Pleiades. The Moon will be about 10o to the west from the Pleiades.

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.


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A Bullish Moon, or A Moon – Bull Conjunction, or Bull Gets Mooned!

   Over the next 3 mornings, July 26, 27,and 28 before sunrise, the waning crescent Moon will be moving across the shoulders and head of the constellation Taurus the Bull. As it traverses the constellation pattern the waning Moon will come within about 8o from the open star cluster, the Pleiades and within about 4-5o from the v-shaped open star cluster the Hyades.
   This should make for some good viewing through binoculars, especially on the 27th when the Moon passes about 2-3o from the reddish star Aldebaran in the Hyades. How close the conjunction between the Moon and Aldebaran will be depends greatly on your viewing location’s longitude. This graphic is for when the two are their closest which is 2.5o around 1 UT (8 pm CDT).


   
   
   


Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.


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Waning Crescent Moon and Open Star Clusters

   Sunday morning June 30th, before sunrise local time, look for a thin 27-day old waning crescent Moon to be close to the two open star clusters in Taurus the Bull, the Pleiades and the Hyades. The Pleiades are about 9-10o west, or above, the Moon, while the v-shaped Hyades and the Moon will all fit within the field of view of binoculars.

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.


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Venus Meets the 7 Sisters

click on graphic to see it larger   Sunday morning June 9th the inner planet Venus will be a few degrees from the open star cluster known as the Pleiades. Both Venus and the Pleiades rise about an hour before sunrise local time and both will fit within the field of view of binoculars.

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.


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