August Perigee Moon

aug2-perigee-moon   The Moon reaches perigee, (minimum distance from Earth), this month on Sunday August 2nd at 10:08 UT (5:08 am CDT). At that time the Moon will more or less be at a distance of 28.39 Earth diameters (362,139 km or 225,027 miles) from the Earth.
   Does our Moon actually go around the Earth as this graphic shows? From our perspective on the Earth the Moon appears to circle around the Earth. However, in reality, the Moon orbits the Sun together with the Earth*
*Click here to read my 2006 Scope on the Sky column “The Real Shape of the Moon’s Orbit”. (PDF)

   The 18-day old waning gibbous Moon rises around 11 pm local time and is over the southern horizon at sunrise. As this graphic shows the Moon is more or less where it was at this time and Moon phase last month below the right side of the asterism “the Square of Pegasus” and nearly in line with that side.

   
   
   

Caution: Objects viewed with an optical aid are further than they appear.
Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for more observing information for this month.

May Perigee Moon

may15-perigee   The Moon reaches perigee, (minimum distance from Earth), this month on Friday May 15th at 00:26 UT (7:26 pm CDT Thursday May 14th). At that time the Moon will more or less be at a distance of 28.70 Earth diameters (366,024 km or 227,437 miles) from the Earth.
   Does our Moon actually go around the Earth as this graphic shows? From our perspective on the Earth the Moon appears to circle around the Earth. However, in reality, the Moon orbits the Sun together with the Earth*
*Click here to read my 2006 Scope on the Sky column “The Real Shape of the Moon’s Orbit”. (PDF)

   The thin waning crescent Moon rises about one hour before sunrise local time and is about 2 days from New Moon phase on the 18th.

   
   
   

Caution: Objects viewed with an optical aid are further than they appear.
Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for more observing information for this month.

Thin Moon – Thin Venus

28jan   Tuesday morning look toward the southeast sky for a thin 26.8 day old waning crescent Moon about 7 degrees to the right (west) from the bright Venus. Both objects will fit within the field of view of most binoculars.
   Both Venus and our Moon show a similar phase appearance for the same reason – the relative angle between the Earth, Sun, Moon, and Venus. The banner graphic is an exaggerated view of Venus and our Moon but I did this to show their similar appearance.

Click on graphic to see it full size.

Click on graphic to see it full size.

    Venus and the Moon are in the same approximate direction, and Venus is moving westward out away from the Sun while the Moon is moving eastward toward the Sun and new Moon phase.

   
   
   

   
   
   
Caution: Objects viewed with an optical aid are further than they appear.
   Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for more observing information for this month.