The Moon, Jupiter, and Spica – Together Again


   Wednesday February 15th the 18-day old waning gibbous Moon will be within a few degrees from the planet Jupiter and the blue-white star Spica in Virgo the Harvest Maiden as they rise in the east a few hours before sunrise local time.
   All three will fit within the field of view of a pair of 7×50 binoculars as this graphic shows.

   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.

Jupiter Goes Retro

   The giant outer planet Jupiter slows down and reverses its orbital motion on Monday February 6th as it begins its more or less annual retrograde motion. Retrograde motion is an apparent motion that occurs for an outer planet (past Earth’s orbit) when the faster moving Earth catches up with and then passes by the outer planet. During this retrograde motion Jupiter will move westward starting near the blue-white star Spica in Virgo the Harvest Maiden.

   Jupiter currently rises about around midnight local time and is very visible above the southwestern horizon sunrise.

   
   
   
   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.

Jupiter Closest to Spica – This Time Around

1feb-bino
   Thursday February 2nd the giant gas planet Jupiter will be its closest to the blue-white star Spica in Virgo the Harvest Maiden. The two will be separated by about 3o.

These two graphics show the sky as viewed from Quito Ecuador at 0o latitude, and my home latitude of approximately 40o North.

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.

Moon Skips Past Stars and Planets

   Over the next several mornings, January 23rd to 25th the waning crescent Moon will pass by the star Antares, and the planets Saturn, and Mercury as these animated graphics are showing.

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.

Moon Near Jupiter and Spica


   Thursday January 19th morning several hours before sunrise local time the last quarter Moon will be within a few degrees from Jupiter and the blue-white star Spica in Virgo the Harvest Maiden.
This graphic simulates a view using 10×50 binoculars.


   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.

Jupiter at Quadrature ——— Venus at Elongation

   Thursday January 12th the gas giant planet Jupiter reaches the point along its orbit around the Sun where Jupiter would be described as being at western quadrature. It is at a 90o angle relative to the Earth and the Sun.
   Also on this day the inner planet Venus reaches a point in its orbit known as eastern elongation. This puts Venus at somewhere around a 90o angle relative to the Earth and the Sun when viewed looking down from above the solar system but Venus is on the other side of the Sun from where Uranus is currently located.
   In terms of elongation Venus is 47.2o to the east of the Sun. In terms of viewing angle you are the point of a triangle with Venus at the left base corner and the Sun at the right base corner. The angle between the Sun and Venus is the elongation angle, and at 47.2o Venus sets around 3 hours after sunset as its seting motion or speed is (15o per hour based on Earth rotation rate.
   Where is Jupiter currently? Jupiter rises around midnight local time and is located high above the southern horizon at sunrise local time near the blue-white star Spica in Virgo the Harvest Maiden.
   And Venus? Can’t miss this planet as it is the brighest stellar object over the western horizon at sunset.
   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.

2017 Quadrantid Meteor Shower

   The annual Quadrantid Meteor Shower reaches its peak Tuesday morning January 3rd officially at 15 UT (10 am CST). The Quadrantids are one of the best meteor showers of the year but does not get much attention possibly because it’s winter in the northern hemisphere, and this area of the sky is not easily seen from south of the equator.
   The ZHR (average hourly rate) for this meteor shower ranges from 60 to several hundred. Best time for viewing is before sunrise as your part of the Earth is rotating toward the east sort of putting you headfirst into the meteor shower. To find the radiant for this meteor shower look for the stars of the Big Dipper and then look below the end stars in the handle.

Boötes the Herdsman

Boötes the Herdsman

   The radiant is the area from where the meteors seem to radiate outward from. Meteor showers owe their name to the constellation region the radiant is located within, and as this graphic shows the radiant is within the boundary of the constellation Boötes the Herdsman. So why the name Quadrantids?
   On some of the older star charts there is a now ‘extinct’ constellation called Quadrans Muralis, the Mural. This was a constellation located between Boötes and Draco the Dragon that was created in 1795 by French Astronomer Jérôme Lalande. It is a picture, or mural, of a Quadrant that had been used to map the stars. The Quadrantids Meteor Shower was named for the no longer used constellation.

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.