Mercury at East Elongation

orbital-positions   Friday September 4th Mercury, the innermost planet, will reach its orbital position known as greatest eastern elongation. At that moment Mercury, the Sun, and the Earth, would be arranged in something close to approximating a right angle as this graphic shows.
   From our perspective Mercury, and Venus for that matter, appear to move out to the left (east) from the Sun for a period, then reverse and move westward between the Earth and the Sun to western elongation. From there the inner planet moves eastward going behind the Sun and eventually reappearing on the eastern side of the Sun for an eastern elongation. Repeat over and over – do not stop!
   Mercury is currently visible as an ‘evening star’ over the western horizon at sunset. Saturn is also visible over the southern horizon west of Antares. Not bright enough to be visible are two of the dwarf planets in our solar system, Makemake and Haumea.

   
   
   
Caution: Objects viewed with an optical aid are further than they appear.
   Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for more observing information for this month.

Mercury at Eastern Elongation

orbital-positions   Thursday May 7th at 5 UT (or midnight CDT Wednesday May 6th Mercury, the innermost planet, will reach its orbital position known as greatest eastern elongation. At that moment Mercury, the Sun, and the Earth, would be arranged in something close to approximating a right angle as this graphic shows.
   From our perspective Mercury, and Venus for that matter, appear to move out to the left (east) from the Sun for a period, then reverse and move westward between the Earth and the Sun to western elongation. From there the inner planet moves eastward going behind the Sun and eventually reappearing on the eastern side of the Sun for an eastern elongation. Repeat over and over – do not stop!
   Mercury is currently visible as an ‘evening star’ over the western horizon at sunset. The brighter planets Venus and Jupiter are very visible higher above the horizon. It may also be possible to see Mars – depending on your local horizon.

   
   
   
Caution: Objects viewed with an optical aid are further than they appear.
   Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for more observing information for this month.

Mercury at Eastern Elongation

orbital-positions   Mercury, the innermost planet, has reached its orbital position known as greatest eastern elongation. At that moment Mercury, the Sun, and the Earth, would be arranged in something close to approximating a right angle as this graphic shows.
   From our perspective Mercury, and Venus for that matter, appear to move out to the left (east) from the Sun for a period, then reverse and move westward between the Earth and the Sun to western elongation. From there the inner planet moves eastward going behind the Sun and eventually reappearing on the eastern side of the Sun for an eastern elongation. Repeat over and over – do not stop!
   Mercury is currently visible as an ‘evening star’ over the western horizon at sunset.

   
   
   
Caution: Objects viewed with an optical aid are further than they appear.
   Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for more observing information for this month.

Saturn – Mercury Conjunction

26nov-ani   Before sunrise Tuesday morning, 26 November, the planets Mercury and Saturn will be rising around 30 minutes or so before the Sun. The two planets will be less than 1 degree from each other. If you are able to follow these two planets for the next 2-3 days you will see that they quickly move apart. Both planets are moving eastward however Mercury, as the innermost planet, orbits around the Sun considerably faster than Saturn. This animated graphic is set to 1 frame per day and starts with the 25th and ends on the 28th. The 2nd magnitude star Zubenelgenubi in Libra the Scales is about 1-2 degrees from the two planets.

26nov   Click on thumbnail to see a ‘dream’ view before sunrise on the 26th.

   
   
   
Caution: Objects viewed with an optical aid are further than they appear.
Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for more observing information for this month.

3 Amigos – The Line Up

'3 amigos'

‘3 amigos’

   This evening, Saturday 1 June, look westward shortly after sunset to see three planets arranged in a diagonal line – from ‘top to bottom’ – Mercury, Venus, and Jupiter as this graphic shows.

Click on image to see it full size

Click on image to see it full size

   As the sky darkens and the planets are setting grab your binoculars or telescope and take a closer look at Mercury. This innermost planet is very close to the open star cluster M-35, also described as NGC-2168, located near the feet of the Gemini Twins. Just below M-35 is a fainter and more compact open star cluster NGC-2158. Click on this image to see it full size and as an animated zoom in showing more detail.

   Celestial objects with the letter ‘M’ preceding the number refers to objects observed and catalog by the French astronomer Charles Messier. Objects having the letters ‘NGC’ preceding the number refer to objects that are listed in the New General Catalog of celestial objects.

   Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for more observing information.