Waxing Gibbous Moon Near Aldebaran

   Tuesday evening January 7th the 13-day old waxing gibbous Moon will be about 3-4o from the reddish star Aldebaran. Aldebaran is known as the ‘angry’ red eye of the constellation pattern Taurus the Bull.

    Aldebaran is located at one end of a v-shaped cluster of stars making up the face of the Bull. This group of stars are all part of an open star cluster known as the Hyades. They are one of two naked-eye visible open star clusters within the boundaries of the constellation. The other one is the little dipper-shaped group known as the Pleiades.

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.


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Waning Crescent Moon and Open Star Clusters

   Sunday morning June 30th, before sunrise local time, look for a thin 27-day old waning crescent Moon to be close to the two open star clusters in Taurus the Bull, the Pleiades and the Hyades. The Pleiades are about 9-10o west, or above, the Moon, while the v-shaped Hyades and the Moon will all fit within the field of view of binoculars.

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.


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Moon and the Hyades

   Wednesday and Thursday January 16th and the 17th the waning gibbous Moon will be passing past the open star cluster the Hyades and the reddish star Aldebaran. This is a v-shaped group of stars that make up the face of Taurus the Bull. The Hyades is one of two open star clusters in the constellation Taurus. The other is a small dipper-shaped group of stars, the Pleiades, located on the shoulder of Taurus.

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.


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Moon Traverses Taurus


   Wednesday and Thursday evenings March 21st and 22nd the waxing crescent Moon will pass across the constellation of Taurus the Bull. It will first be several degrees from the open star cluster the Pleiades and then the next day the Moon will be within 1-2o from the reddish star Aldebaran and the open star cluster the Hyades. The latter should prove to be a striking sight through binoculars.

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.

Moon Gets A Bullish Headbutt

   Friday evening February 23rd the 8-day old waxing gibbous Moon will be about 6o from the reddish star Aldebaran, part of the open star cluster the Hyades. The brighter stars of the Hyades are arranged in a v-shape that is used to represent the face of Taurus the Bull. The point of the V is the Bull’s nose and the reddish star Aldebaran is one of the Bull’s eyes, often depicted as the ‘angry eye’ of the Bull.

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.

When the Moon Hits You In The Eye!


   Tuesday September 12th the 18-day old waning gibbous Moon will be once again poking Taurus the Bull in the eye! Actually the Moon will be within about 0.5o from the reddish star Aldebaran, the ‘angry eye’ of Taurus.
   
   
   
some extra Bob’s Space
   
   
   


   With binoculars the view of the Moon this close to Aldebaran and the rest of the v-shaped group of stars making up the open star cluster the Hyades should be as good as this graphic shows. But minus the blue lines!

   
   
   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.

Taurus Gets An Eyeful!

   Thursday July 13th morning in the couple of hours before sunrise local time the inner planet Venus will be within about 3o from the reddish star Aldebaran in Taurus the Bull. Aldebaran is often described as the “red, angry eye” of Taurus. It is located at the end of the v-shaped open star cluster the Hyades, a ‘loose’ grouping of several hundred stars of which the brightest form the v-shape of the Bull’s face.
   On the 13th Venus becomes the other eye of the Bull. The apparent brightness or magnitude difference between Venus (-4.07) and Aldebaran (0.84) is quite striking.

Venus passing Aldebaran July 12th-17th   Over the next few days Venus will steadily move away, toward the east, from Aldebaran as this animated graphic is showing. It is a simulated view through 10×50 binoculars and runs from July 12th to July 17th.

   
   
   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.