Mars and Neptune at Heliocentric Opposition

neptune-view

   Monday October 23rd two of the outer planets, Mars and Neptune, will be at heliocentric opposition, that is on opposite sides of the Sun. On that day the two planets will be separated by 180o. Mars will have a heliocentric longitude of 163o while Neptune will be at a heliocentric longitude of 343o. (343o – 163o = 180o)
   
   
   
   
Caution: Objects viewed with an optical aid are further than they appear.
Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for more observing information for this month.

What’s Opposite Uranus?

   Tuesday July 11th two of the outer planets, Jupiter and Uranus, will be at heliocentric opposition. The two planets will be on opposite sides of the Sun and will be approximately 180o apart. Jupiter at 205o, and Uranus at 25o.
   Earth is in this graphic but not as part of the heliocentric opposition. A few days ago Jupiter was at eastern quadrature.

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.

Mars – Saturn at Heliocentric Opposition


   Monday May 1st the planets Mars and Saturn will have reached a point in their respective orbits where they are on opposite sides of the Sun and are approximately 180o apart, or at what is called heliocentric opposition. Using the system of heliocentric longitude Mars has a heliocentric longitude of 83o while Saturn has a heliocentric longitude of 263o

   Mars is visible above the western horizon at around sunset local time near the two open star clusters of Taurus the Bull – the Pleiades and the Hyades. On the other side of the sky, over the eastern horizon is Saturn, rising around midnight local time.

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.

Mars and Jupiter at Heliocentric Opposition

31oct-view-from-mars   Thursday December 22nd the planets Mars and Jupiter are aligned in an arrangement known as heliocentric opposition. The two planets are on opposite sides of the Sun and are approximately 180o apart in heliocentric longitude as measured around the celestial equator. Mars has a heliocentric longitude of approximately 10o, while Jupiter is at 190o. However the two planets are not necessarily at the same level (above or below) relative to the ecliptic. Both planets are south of the celestial equator with Mars at 12o South Declination in Aquarius the Water Bearer, and Jupiter, at 6o South Declination, is in the constellation of Virgo the Harvest Maiden.

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.

Mars and Uranus at Odds


   Saturday February 27th Mars and Uranus will reached their respective orbital positions that have them 180o apart. Mars is located at approximately 200o and Uranus at approximately 20o of heliocentric longitude. This called heliocentric opposition.

   
   
   
   

Caution: Objects viewed with an optical aid are further than they appear.
Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for more observing information for this month.

Mars and Neptune at Opposition

neptune-view

   Thursday November 26th two of the outer planets, Mars and Neptune, will be at heliocentric opposition, that is on opposite sides of the Sun. On that day the two planets will be separated by 180o. Mars will have a heliocentric longitude of 158.9o while Neptune will be at a heliocentric longitude of 338.9o. (338.9o – 158.9o = 180o)
   
   
   
   
Caution: Objects viewed with an optical aid are further than they appear.
Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for more observing information for this month.

Jupiter and Neptune – Opposites!

jupiter-neptune-helio-banner   Thursday November 5th two of the outer planets, Jupiter and Neptune, will be at what is known as heliocentric opposition. They are 180o apart on opposite sides of the Sun. Jupiter has a heliocentric longitude of 158o while Neptune has a heliocentric longitude of 338o.

   
   
   
   

Caution: Objects viewed with an optical aid are further than they appear.
Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for more observing information for this month.