It’s About Mars

Click on image to see full size

Click on image to see full size

   Tomorrow morning, 17 August, an hour or so before sunrise look toward the eastern horizon for the planet Mars to rise with the constellation of the Gemini Twins. Mars will be less than 5 degrees from the the star Pollux and easily see together with Mars within the field of view of binoculars as the inset to the graphic on the right shows.
mars jupiter   Shortly after sunrise Mars will reach an interesting position in its orbit relative to the Sun and the planet Jupiter. Both Mars and Jupiter will be at heliocentric conjunction with each other. Both planets will be at approximately 93 degrees heliocentric longitude.

   
   
   
   
   
   Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for more observing information.

Equality at Sunset

9 p.m. CDT

9 p.m. CDT

   An interesting arrangement of the two largest planets in our solar system, Jupiter and Saturn, is taking place at sunset local time. Jupiter and the last of the winter constellation are over the western horizon as it is setting. While above the eastern horizon is the planet Saturn as it rises with the stars of spring. For the next few evenings each planet will be approximately the same altitude above their respective horizon at 9 p.m. local time as the banner graphic at the top of the page shows.

   Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for more observing information.

Moon – Venus Conjunction

Moon Venus Conjunction

Monday morning watch for the thin waning crescent Moon to be close to the very bright planet Venus. Up to the right is Jupiter and if you have a clear and relatively flat eastern horizon you may even catch a glimpse of the other inner planet, Mercury.

Be sure to visit Qué tal for more observing information.