A Trail of 2 Geologies

   The Desert Is Calling!
   All trails lead west, or south, or anywhere but here. I am heading to Arizona for some latitude adjustment. Hiking, bouldering, and enjoying the desert/mountain Geology of Arizona as compared to the Geology of west central Missouri. So the next several posts will be from a desert perspective, looking Earthward as well as skyward.

   This map was made using Google Earth and a Geologic map made for each state. They are prepared as a KMZ file which may be loaded into Google Earth. Download the files by state from the USGS Geologic maps of US states web site.

   Yeah I know it is very hot there but, like a Pizza oven, it’s a dry heat!

   
   
   
   
   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.


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Tweets From ISS

iss-pic   If you have followed my postings you know that I am an avid fan of watching for the International Space Station passages over my part of the world. I especially enjoy capturing the ISS as it travels past celestial objects like the Moon.
iss-crop   In an interesting twist it is possible to take advantage of the ‘bird’s-eye’ view from the ISS and see what the ISS astronauts see as they orbit the Earth. Listed below are some of the web sites with pictures taken by ISS astronauts, however I wanted to call attention to this web site – ISS EXPS 40 & 41. This web site has a map of the world that links tweets from the astronauts to accompany the pictures they took of the Earth’s surface.
   Additionally the web site shows the position of the ISS updated every minute so you can track its current flight and position as you browse the pictures.
Click here to go to the ISS Exps 40 & 41 website.

Some ISS sighting web sites:

NASA Space Station Live
ISS Sightings
Heavens Above

Pictures from Astronauts on the ISS:

Gateway to Astronaut Photography of Earth
ISS Astronaut Pictures of Earth

   
   
   
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Caution: Objects viewed with an optical aid are further than they appear.
   Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for more observing information for this month.

A Song For My Science Class

   One of my college classes is Physical Science, which is essentially a general science course covering Physics, Chemistry, Earth Science, and Astronomy. Part of the class, 10% of the grade, is from having students do independent projects on topics relating to the class content. They may do anything from research, article summary’s, writing poems, developing lesson plans, and basically using their own interests in selecting the projects. One of my students wrote and performed a song that fits very nicely in the section we covered on Earth Science – plate tectonics, plate boundaries, subduction, faults (not mine!), and volcanoes.

   
   
   
Caution: Objects viewed with an optical aid are further than they appear.
   Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for more observing information for this month.

Arizona Pans

   For the past week or so I have been in Tucson Arizona visiting family. One of the benefits of this part of the country is that the skies are clear — most of the time. With every visit here I make plans for taking some pictures at night as well as during the day. This visit was during the local monsoon season when the skies are cloudy, the temperature is high, as is the humidity, and it rains. So most of my pictures are of the spectacular desert and mountain scenery around the Tucson valley and mountains.
   Using the Microsoft software program, Photosynth, I’ve composed several panoramas of various locations around the Tucson area. Panoramas are from a park and a natural spring on the east side of Tucson; the Saguaro (Cactus) National Park; and along the Catalina Highway on Mt. Lemmon.
   Click on the link below each picture to go to my Photosynth web page to see that panorama.








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Saguaro National ParkRincon Mountain Valley


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Saguaro National ParkRincon Mountains


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Saguaro National ParkJavelina Point

   

   
   
   Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for more observing information.