From a Crab to a Lion

   Over the next two evenings, January 11th and 12th, the waning gibbous Moon moves from near the Beehive Cluster, M-44, an open star cluster in Cancer the Crab to near the bright star Regulus in Leo the Lion. M-44, with an apparent magnitude of 3.50 in a dark sky without the Moon nearby is visible to the unaided eye and is easily seen with optical assistance like binoculars, or a low-power wide field eyepiece.


   
   
   

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The Moon and the Twins


   Thursday evening January 10th the 16-day old waning gibbous Moon will be about 6-7o from the star Pollux. Pollux is one of the two Gemini Twin stars.

   
   
   

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January Moon at Ascending Node

   Wednesday January 9th the 14.8-day old nearly full Moon rises between the legs of the Gemini Twins. The Moon will be about 14-15o to the west from the ‘Twin’ Stars Pollux and Gemini.

   As it is rising the Moon will be crossing the plane of the ecliptic moving north. This is known as the ascending node, one of two intersections the Moon’s orbital path has with the ecliptic. The ecliptic is actually the Earth’s orbit, and the Moon’s orbit is inclined about 6o from the ecliptic. So there are two node intersections, the ascending and descending nodes.

   Does our Moon actually go around the Earth as many graphics show? From our perspective on the Earth the Moon appears to circle around the Earth. However, in reality, the Moon orbits the Sun together with the Earth*
*Click here to read my 2006 Scope on the Sky column “The Real Shape of the Moon’s Orbit”. (PDF)

   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.


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Waxing Gibbous Moon Near Aldebaran

   Tuesday evening January 7th the 13-day old waxing gibbous Moon will be about 3-4o from the reddish star Aldebaran. Aldebaran is known as the ‘angry’ red eye of the constellation pattern Taurus the Bull.

    Aldebaran is located at one end of a v-shaped cluster of stars making up the face of the Bull. This group of stars are all part of an open star cluster known as the Hyades. They are one of two naked-eye visible open star clusters within the boundaries of the constellation. The other one is the little dipper-shaped group known as the Pleiades.

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.


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Quadrantid Meteor Shower – 2020

   The annual Quadrantid Meteor Shower reaches its peak Saturday morning January 4th officially at 4 UT (Friday January 4th 10:00 pm CST). The Quadrantids are one of the best meteor showers of the year but does not get much attention possibly because it’s winter in the northern hemisphere, and this area of the sky is not easily seen from south of the equator.

Boötes the Herdsman

Boötes the Herdsman

   The radiant is the area from where the meteors seem to radiate outward from. Meteor showers owe their name to the constellation region the radiant is located within, and as this graphic shows the radiant is within the boundary of the constellation Boötes the Herdsman.

   So why the name Quadrantids?
   On some of the older star charts there is a now ‘extinct’ constellation called Quadrans Muralis, the Mural. This was a constellation located between Boötes and Draco the Dragon that was created in 1795 by French Astronomer Jérôme Lalande. It is a picture, or mural, of a Quadrant that had been used to map the stars. The Quadrantids Meteor Shower was named for the no longer used constellation.

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.

Mars – Uranus at Heliocentric Opposition

   Friday January 3rd Mars and Uranus will reached their respective orbital positions that have them 180o apart. Mars will be located at approximately 215.3o and Uranus at approximately 35.3o of heliocentric longitude. This called heliocentric opposition.

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.


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January Moon at Apogee

   Our Moon reaches apogee, (greatest distance from Earth), for this orbit, on Thursday January 2nd. At that time the Moon will be at a distance of 31.71 Earth diameters 251,394 miles (404,580 km) from the Earth.

   On the day of the apogee Moon the 8-day old first quarter Moon rises around noon local time and sets around midnight. At around sunset the Moon will over the southern horizon.

   Does our Moon actually go around the Earth as this graphic shows? From our perspective on the Earth the Moon appears to circle around the Earth. However, in reality, the Moon orbits the Sun together with the Earth*

   *Click here to read my 2006 Scope on the Sky column “The Real Shape of the Moon’s Orbit”. (PDF)

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to go to bobs-spaces.


Also Follow me and other great resources at Feedspot.