October Moon at Ascending Node, and at Perigee

   Wednesday October 31st the 22-day old last quarter Moon will be crossing the ecliptic moving north. This is known as the ascending node, one of two intersections the Moon’s orbital path has with the ecliptic. (see animated graphic below)
   Also on that same day, Wednesday October 31st, the last quarter Moon reaches perigee, (closest distance from Earth). At that time the Moon will more or less be at a distance of 29.025 Earth diameters, (230,032 miles 370,201 km), from the Earth.


On the day of perigee and ascending node the first quarter Moon rises at around midnight and is only a few degrees away from the open star cluster M-44, the Beehive Cluster.

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.


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October Moon at Ascending Node

   Thursday October 4th the waning crescent Moon will be crossing the plane of the ecliptic moving north relative to the ecliptic. This is known as the ascending node, one of two intersections the Moon’s orbital path has with the ecliptic. The ecliptic is actually the Earth’s orbit and the Moon’s orbit is inclined about 6o from the ecliptic. So there are two node intersections, the ascending and descending nodes.

   On the day of the node crossing the 26-day old thin waning crescent Moon will be about 1o from the open star cluster known as the ‘Beehive Cluster’, M-44. Given that the Moon has an apparent magnitude of 14.0 compared with the 4th magnitude of the Beehive Cluster it may be difficult to see the star cluster.

   Does our Moon actually go around the Earth as many graphics show? From our perspective on the Earth the Moon appears to circle around the Earth. However, in reality, the Moon orbits the Sun together with the Earth*

*Click here to read my 2006 Scope on the Sky column “The Real Shape of the Moon’s Orbit”. (PDF)

Read this very informative article about the Earth-Moon system and their orbital motions, written by Joe Hanson. “Do We Orbit the Moon?”

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.


Also Follow me and other great resources at Feedspot.

September Moon at Ascending Node

   Thursday September 6th the waning crescent Moon will be crossing the plane of the ecliptic moving north relative to the ecliptic. This is known as the ascending node, one of two intersections the Moon’s orbital path has with the ecliptic. The ecliptic is actually the Earth’s orbit and the Moon’s orbit is inclined about 6o from the ecliptic. So there are two node intersections, the ascending and descending nodes.

On the day of the node crossing the 26-day old thin waning crescent Moon will be about 13o east (left) from the star Procyon in the constellation Canis Minor.

   Does our Moon actually go around the Earth as many graphics show? From our perspective on the Earth the Moon appears to circle around the Earth. However, in reality, the Moon orbits the Sun together with the Earth*

*Click here to read my 2006 Scope on the Sky column “The Real Shape of the Moon’s Orbit”. (PDF)

Read this very informative article about the Earth-Moon system and their orbital motions, written by Joe Hanson. “Do We Orbit the Moon?”

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.


Also Follow me and other great resources at Feedspot.

Circumstances for a Solar Eclipse


   Friday July 13th and Saturday the 14th circumstances are such that there will be a partial solar eclipse that will be best viewed from along the northern coast of Antarctica. (hey! every Antarctic coast is a northern coast!!
Specifically the partial solar eclipse will be visible at around 129o E near the Claire Coast.

   Circumstances for a solar eclipse, like for a lunar eclipse, require the Moon to be at either its ascending node or its descending node and be at or close to either new or full Moon phase. A node crossing occurs when the Moon with an orbit tilted 6o from the ecliptic (the Earth’s orbit) intersects the ecliptic.


   The Moon has an elliptically shaped orbit so if the timing for lunar apogee (furthest from Earth) or perigee (closest to the Earth) happens around a new Moon at a node crossing then the apparent size of the Moon will be anywhere from smaller to larger than the Sun’s apparent size. Smaller means a longer eclipse including the length of totality.


   
   
   However the bottom line is the timing between the node crossing and new Moon. This time the Moon crosses the ecliptic moving north, ascending node, approximately 24 hours after new Moon phase setting up a partial solar eclipse.

So what are the circumstances?
Times are in Universal Time (CDT = UT-5)
   July 13th
   1:48 UT – Partial Solar Eclipse Begins
   2:48 UT – New Moon — Partial Solar Eclipse
   3:01 UT – Mid-Eclipse (maximum Sun covered)
   4:13 UT – Partial Solar Eclipse Ends
   8:27 UT – Moon at Perigee – 357, 432 km (222,098 miles)
   July 14th
   2:52 UT – Moon at Ascending Node

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.


Also Follow me and other great resources at Feedspot.

June Moon at Ascending Node

   Saturday June 16th the waxing crescent Moon will be crossing the plane of the ecliptic moving north relative to the ecliptic. This is known as the ascending node, one of two intersections the Moon’s orbital path has with the ecliptic. The ecliptic is actually the Earth’s orbit and the Moon’s orbit is inclined about 6o from the ecliptic. So there are two node intersections, the ascending and descending nodes.

   On Saturday evening June 16th the 3.5-day old waxing crescent Moon will be about 8o east (left) from the planet Venus and about 3o from the open star cluster, M-44 also, known as the ‘Beehive Cluster’.

   Does our Moon actually go around the Earth as many graphics show? From our perspective on the Earth the Moon appears to circle around the Earth. However, in reality, the Moon orbits the Sun together with the Earth*

*Click here to read my 2006 Scope on the Sky column “The Real Shape of the Moon’s Orbit”. (PDF)

Read this very informative article about the Earth-Moon system and their orbital motions, written by Joe Hanson. “Do We Orbit the Moon?”

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.


Also Follow me and other great resources at Feedspot.

May Moon at Ascending Node

   Sunday May 20th the waxing crescent Moon will be crossing the plane of the ecliptic moving north relative to the ecliptic. This is known as the ascending node, one of two intersections the Moon’s orbital path has with the ecliptic. The ecliptic is actually the Earth’s orbit and the Moon’s orbit is inclined about 6o from the ecliptic. So there are two node intersections, the ascending and descending nodes.

   On Sunday evening May 20th the 5.5-day old waxing crescent Moon will be just within the boundaries of Leo the Lion and about 14o west (right) from the ‘Heart’ of the Lion, the star Regulus.

   Does our Moon actually go around the Earth as many graphics show? From our perspective on the Earth the Moon appears to circle around the Earth. However, in reality, the Moon orbits the Sun together with the Earth*

*Click here to read my 2006 Scope on the Sky column “The Real Shape of the Moon’s Orbit”. (PDF)

Read this very informative article about the Earth-Moon system and their orbital motions, written by Joe Hanson. “Do We Orbit the Moon?”

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.

April Moon at Ascending Node

   Monday April 23rd the waxing gibbous Moon will be crossing the plane of the ecliptic moving north relative to the ecliptic. This is known as the ascending node, one of two intersections the Moon’s orbital path has with the ecliptic. The ecliptic is actually the Earth’s orbit and the Moon’s orbit is inclined about 6o from the ecliptic. So there are two node intersections, the ascending and descending nodes.


   On Monday evening April 23rd the 8-day old waxing gibbous Moon will be within the boundaries of Leo the Lion and about 7o west (right) from the ‘Heart’ of the Lion, the star Regulus.

   Does our Moon actually go around the Earth as many graphics show? From our perspective on the Earth the Moon appears to circle around the Earth. However, in reality, the Moon orbits the Sun together with the Earth*

*Click here to read my 2006 Scope on the Sky column “The Real Shape of the Moon’s Orbit”. (PDF)

Read this very informative article about the Earth-Moon system and their orbital motions, written by Joe Hanson. “Do We Orbit the Moon?”

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.