June Moon at Apogee


   Our Moon reaches apogee, (greatest distance from Earth), on Thursday June 8th. At that time the Moon will more or less be at a distance of 31.85 Earth diameters (406,401 km or 252,526 miles) from the Earth.
   Does our Moon actually go around the Earth as this graphic shows? From our perspective on the Earth the Moon appears to circle around the Earth. However, in reality, the Moon orbits the Sun together with the Earth*

*Click here to read my 2006 Scope on the Sky column “The Real Shape of the Moon’s Orbit”. (PDF)

Read this very informative article about the Earth-Moon system and their orbital motions, written by Joe Hanson. “Do We Orbit the Moon?”


   On the day of the apogee Moon the 14-day old full Moon rises around local time for sunset and is 9-10o degrees from the reddish star Antares in Scorpius the Scorpion.

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to go to bobs-spaces.

May Apogee Moon

   Our Moon reaches apogee, (greatest distance from Earth), on Friday May 12th. At that time the Moon will more or less be at a distance of 31.84 Earth diameters (406,210 km or 252,407 miles) from the Earth.
   Does our Moon actually go around the Earth as this graphic shows? From our perspective on the Earth the Moon appears to circle around the Earth. However, in reality, the Moon orbits the Sun together with the Earth*


   The 16-day old waning gibbous Moon rises a few hours before midnight local time, and is located near the reddish star Antares in Scorpius the Scorpion, and the planet Saturn.

*Click here to read my 2006 Scope on the Sky column “The Real Shape of the Moon’s Orbit”. (PDF)

Read this very informative article about the Earth-Moon system and their orbital motions, written by Joe Hanson. “Do We Orbit the Moon?”
   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.

Moon Near Saturn


   Sunday morning, April 16th the 19-day old waning gibbous Moon will rise near the planet Saturn. The two will be within the 7o field of view of 10×50 binoculars and will be easily seen over the eastern to southeastern horizon in the hours before the sun rises.
   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.

March Moon at Apogee

 Our Moon reaches apogee, (greatest distance from Earth), on Saturday March 18th. At that time the Moon will more or less be at a distance of 31.72 Earth diameters (404,640 km or 251,432 miles) from the Earth.
   Does our Moon actually go around the Earth as this graphic shows? From our perspective on the Earth the Moon appears to circle around the Earth. However, in reality, the Moon orbits the Sun together with the Earth*

*Click here to read my 2006 Scope on the Sky column “The Real Shape of the Moon’s Orbit”. (PDF)

Read this very informative article about the Earth-Moon system and their orbital motions, written by Joe Hanson. “Do We Orbit the Moon?”

   On the morning of the apogee Moon the 20-day old waning gibbous Moon rises a couple of hours before the Sun and is visible over the southern horizon.

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to go to bobs-spaces.

Moon Skips Past Stars and Planets

   Over the next several mornings, January 23rd to 25th the waning crescent Moon will pass by the star Antares, and the planets Saturn, and Mercury as these animated graphics are showing.

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.

2 Planets and 1 Star


   Wednesday evening August 24th the planet Mars will be within about 4o from the planet Saturn and 2o from the reddish star Antares in Scorpius the Scorpion. This is about the closest the three will be to each other this year.

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to go to bobs-spaces.

Mars Moves Forward

   Thursday June 30th Mars ends its apparent westward motion (retrograde motion) relative to the stars in the background and resumes its eastward or direct motion. The location of mars for this particular retrograde has the ‘Red Planet’ near a reddish star with a name suggestive of how similar it appears to Mars. This is the star Antares, the heart of Scorpius the Scorpion.
   Antares could be thought to literally translate to ‘anti-Ares’ suggesting that this reddish celestial object should not be confused with Ares, the Greek god of War. Many stars have several names originating several centuries ago and in different languages however many of the translations have Antares meaning ‘equal of Mars’.
   Right now Mars is just past its greatest apparent magnitude, its brightest. This typically happens at around Mars opposition, but Mars is even brighter if its opposition is around the time of its perihelion and the time when Earth is at aphelion.
   Mars is now again moving toward the east and it will gradually move closer to Antares coming within about 1o from Antares on August 24th. However the Earth is also revolving around the Sun so at the same time that Mars is closing in on Antares that part of the sky will be moving further west and setting earlier.

   This year Mars and Antares will still be above the horizon during August and by then local time for sunset will also be earlier.

   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to go to bobs-spaces.net.