Crescent Moon and the Hyades

   Saturday evening April 25th, at around sunset, the 3-day old waxing crescent Moon will be 1-2o from the reddish star Aldebaran in the constellation Taurus the Bull. Aldebaran is the brightest star in Taurus and also the brightest star of the v-shaped open star cluster the Hyades.

   The combination of the waxing crescent Moon with the stars of the Pleiades will make for a good view through binoculars.

   
   
   

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The Moon and the Sisters

   Sunday evening March 1st the 7.5-day old nearly first quarter Moon, but still a waxing crescent Moon, will be 7-8o from the open star cluster the Pleiades. A few degrees from the Pleiades is another open star cluster the Hyades.
   These two open star clusters are part of the constellation Taurus the Bull. The Hyades make up the face of the Bull, while the Pleiades are located on the Bull’s shoulder. The Pleiades are also known as the “Seven Sisters”.
   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.


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Taurus Head-Butts the Moon!

   Monday evening February 3rd the 10-day old waxing gibbous Moon will be about 3-4o from the reddish star Aldebaran in Taurus the Bull. Aldebaran, in mythology, represents the ‘angry eye’ of the Bull. Aldebaran is also the brightest star in the v-shaped Hyades open star cluster. Nearby is another open star cluster, the Pleiades, most observable as a small dipper-shape grouping of stars.

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.


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Waxing Gibbous Moon Near Aldebaran

   Tuesday evening January 7th the 13-day old waxing gibbous Moon will be about 3-4o from the reddish star Aldebaran. Aldebaran is known as the ‘angry’ red eye of the constellation pattern Taurus the Bull.

    Aldebaran is located at one end of a v-shaped cluster of stars making up the face of the Bull. This group of stars are all part of an open star cluster known as the Hyades. They are one of two naked-eye visible open star clusters within the boundaries of the constellation. The other one is the little dipper-shaped group known as the Pleiades.

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.


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The New Year’s Eve Skies of 2019

   The evening skies of this year’s New Year’s Eve begins at sunset with the 6-day old waxing crescent Moon to be about 3-4o from the outer planet Neptune. However with an apparent magnitude of 8 Neptune is only visible with optical assistance. On the other hand the crescent Moon with an apparent magnitude of -13 would be hard to miss!

   Later, at around midnight and centered over the southern horizon will be the ‘regular’ Northern Hemisphere winter display of stars. This is a familiar groups of bright stars in a rough circle around the constellation of Orion the Hunter, and sometimes referred to as the “Winter Hexagon” or ‘Winter Circle”.

   As the winter hexagon the member stars are Rigel in Orion the Hunter, Aldebaran in Taurus the Bull, Capella in Auriga the Charioteer, Pollux and Castor in the Gemini Twins, Procyon in Canis Minor, and Sirius in Canis Major.


   
   
   
   We’ve survived another orbit.
   
   
          Happy New Year!
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.


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Moon Conjunction with Aldebaran

   Tuesday evening, November 10th, about an hour or so after sunset, the 14.5-day old waxing gibbous Moon will be about 2-3o from the reddish star Aldebaran. Aldebaran is at one end of the v-shaped open star cluster the Hyades in Taurus the Bull.

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.


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Moon – Hyades Conjunction

   Wednesday evening November 13th watch for the 17-day old waning gibbous Moon to be rising with the stars of the Hyades, a v-shaped open cluster of stars making up the face of the Bull. The Moon will be about 1o from the brightest of the stars in the Hyades, the reddish star Aldebaran. Both, as well as the v-shaped Hyades will easily fit within the field of view of binoculars.
   From mythology Aldebaran with its reddish color represents the angry eye of Taurus. In that mythology the angry bull has its head lowered as it appears to be reading an attack on Orion the Hunter.

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.


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