Jupiter Closest to Spica – This Time Around

1feb-bino
   Thursday February 2nd the giant gas planet Jupiter will be its closest to the blue-white star Spica in Virgo the Harvest Maiden. The two will be separated by about 3o.

These two graphics show the sky as viewed from Quito Ecuador at 0o latitude, and my home latitude of approximately 40o North.

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.

Moon Conjunction with Mars and Venus

31jan-bino   Wednesday February 1st the 4-day old waxing crescent Moon will be near the planets Mars and Venus as this simulated view with 10×50 binoculars shows.

   These two graphics show the sky as viewed from Quito Ecuador at 0o latitude, and my home latitude of approximately 40o North. 


   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.

Mercury Near Pluto

(posting this ahead of time – on the road back to Quito and no Internet for a couple of days)

   Sunday morning January 29th the innermost planet Mercury will be about 1o from the the former outermost planet and now a Dwarf Planet, Pluto. Mercury with an apparent magnitude of -0.18 far outshines the 14.19 apparent magnitude of Pluto.
These two graphics show the sky as viewed from Quito Ecuador at 0o latitude, and my home latitude of approximately 40o North.

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.

Moon Skips Past Stars and Planets

   Over the next several mornings, January 23rd to 25th the waning crescent Moon will pass by the star Antares, and the planets Saturn, and Mercury as these animated graphics are showing.

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.

Mercury at Western Elongation

19jan-mercury-east-elongation
   On Thursday January 19th Mercury, the innermost planet, will reach its orbital position known as greatest western elongation at 24.1o. At that moment Mercury, the Sun, and the Earth, would be arranged in something close to approximating a right angle as this graphic shows. Even though it sounds confusing at western elongation for either Mercury or Venus the inner planet will be to the right of the Sun as we view them, meaning that at western elongation an inner planet rises in the east before the Sun rises. And at eastern elongation with the inner planet on the left side of the Sun the inner planet follows the Sun across the sky setting after the Sun sets.
orbital-positions
   From our perspective the orbits of Mercury and Venus appear to move from one side of the Sun to the other – out to the left (east) from the Sun to eastern elongation, then reverse and move westward (inferior conjunction) between the Earth and the Sun to western elongation. From there the inner planet moves eastward going behind the Sun (superior conjunction) and eventually reappearing on the eastern side of the Sun for an eastern elongation. Repeat over and over – do not stop!
   Mercury is visible in the morning skies before sunrise as these graphics show.


   
   
   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.

Moon Near Jupiter and Spica


   Thursday January 19th morning several hours before sunrise local time the last quarter Moon will be within a few degrees from Jupiter and the blue-white star Spica in Virgo the Harvest Maiden.
This graphic simulates a view using 10×50 binoculars.


   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.

Mars and Uranus at Heliocentric Conjunction

   Greetings from San Carlos de Bariloche, Argentina. For the next 3 weeks I will be posting with the perspective of viewing the sky from between around 42o-48o south latitude, and then from the equator while in Quito Ecuador.

   On the evening of January 13th both planets, Mars (23o) and Uranus (23o), will be at about the same heliocentric longitude or at heliocentric conjunction. While they may share nearly identical heliocentric longitude coordinates they do not have the same right ascension with Uranus about 2 hours of R.A. west from Mars. Both Mars and Uranus are visible over the southwestern horizon a couple of hours after sunset, although it may prove to be difficult to see Uranus with an apparent magnitude of nearly 6.0.

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.