Taurus Sniffs the Moon!

   Saturday evening November 2nd the 14.5-day old waxing gibbous Moon (full Moon tomorrow) will be a couple of degrees from the reddish star Aldebaran in Taurus the Bull. Aldebaran is at one end of a v-shaped open star cluster, the Hyades, that makes up the face of Taurus. Because of its reddish color it has been described as the angry eye of the bull.
   Normally the Hyades are a great view with binoculars as is the Pleiades, another open star cluster that is often described as a ‘baby dipper’.

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.

November Moon at Ascending Node

   Friday November 10th the last quarter Moon will be crossing the plane of the ecliptic moving north relative to the ecliptic. This is known as the ascending node, one of two intersections the Moon’s orbital path has with the ecliptic. The ecliptic is actually the Earth’s orbit and the Moon’s orbit is inclined about 6o from the ecliptic. So there are two node intersections, the ascending and descending nodes.


   On November 10th the 22-day old last quarter Moon will be within the boundaries of Cancer the Crab and about 2-3o from M-44 the Beehive open star Cluster, and about 6o from Dwarf Planet Ceres.

   The three are close enough for all to fit within the field of view of binoculars.

   Does our Moon actually go around the Earth as many graphics show? From our perspective on the Earth the Moon appears to circle around the Earth. However, in reality, the Moon orbits the Sun together with the Earth*

*Click here to read my 2006 Scope on the Sky column “The Real Shape of the Moon’s Orbit”. (PDF)

Read this very informative article about the Earth-Moon system and their orbital motions, written by Joe Hanson. “Do We Orbit the Moon?”

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.

Ceres Gets Buzzed

   Tuesday morning October 17th the Dwarf Planet Ceres will be within about 3o from M-44, the open star cluster commonly known as the Beehive Cluster. Both will easily fit within the field of view of binoculars and with some careful observation Ceres at 8th magnitude might be identified just to the left from M-44 which appears as a 4th magnitude ‘smudge’ of light.

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.

Waning Crescent Moon Near Dwarf Planet Ceres, and M-44

   Friday morning October 13th, in the hours before sunrise, look toward the eastern horizon for the 23-day old waning crescent Moon to be about 15o east, to the left from the star Procyon (0.37 apparent magnitude). The Moon will also be to the west, right, about 4o from the open star cluster M-44, the Beehive Cluster, and about 6o from Dwarf Planet Ceres.

   The above graphic is set for 3:30 am CDT and not shown in that graphic are the planets Venus and Mars. You may see them here in this graphic set for two hours later – 6:30 am CDT.

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.

Moon Gets Stung – Sort of


   Saturday morning September 16th the thin waning crescent Moon will be 2-3o from the open star cluster M-44, or as it more commonly known the Beehive Cluster. This should make for a great view using binoculars.

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.

Moon Conjunction with Aldebaran


   The Moon this morning, September 12th at 5:50 am CDT within about 0.5o from the star Aldebaran in Taurus the Bull. None of the other stars making up the v-shaped open star cluster the Hyades were visible as the reflected light from the Moon was too bright.
   Camera Canon Rebel T7i:
   300 mm; f/25; 1/4 sec.; ISO-100.

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.

Triangulating with the Moon

   Tuesday morning, August 15th the 23-day old first quarter Moon will be the point of a celestial triangle with the two open star clusters, the Pleiades, and the Hyades as this graphic shows. The v-shaped Hyades forms the face of Taurus the Bull while the ‘dipper-shaped’ Pleiades lies along the Bull’s shoulder. Both open star clusters are about 8o from the Moon.

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.