March Moon at Descending Node #2

   Friday March 29th the Moon will be crossing the plane of the ecliptic moving south. This is known as the descending node, one of two intersections the Moon’s orbital path (dark green line) has with the ecliptic.
29 March 6 am CDT   On the day of the node crossing the 23-day old waning crescent Moon will be over the southeast horizon rising about 1-2 hours before the Sun rises. Toward the west from the Moon will be the outer ringed-planet Jupiter, and a bit further west the dwarf planet Ceres. About 4o east from the Moon is the outer ringed-planet Saturn. Both of these will easily fit within the field of view of 7×50 binoculars.
   
   
   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.


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Moon – Saturn Conjunction

   Thursday morning March 28th, and Friday morning March 29th the first quarter and waning crescent Moon, respectively, pass by the outer ringed giant planet, Saturn, coming within about 8o on Thursday and about 4o on Friday from Saturn.


   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.


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Moon – Jupiter Conjunction

   Wednesday morning March 27th the 20-day old waning gibbous Moon will be within about 4o from the outer giant ringed planet Jupiter. The Moon and Jupiter are both within about 20o east (left) from the reddish star Antares in Scorpius the Scorpion.
   Further eastward is another outer ringed giant planet, Saturn. This is where the Moon will be in 2 days.
   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.


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Moon – Ceres Conjunction

   Tuesday morning March 26th the 20-day old waning gibbous Moon will be about 4o from Dwarf Planet Ceres, and about 10o from the reddish star Antares in Scorpius the Scorpion. Further east from the Moon is the planet Jupiter and is near where the Moon will be tomorrow.

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.


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ISS and a Plane

   This past Thursday evening and Friday evening the ISS (International Space Station) orbited over the midwest United States. Thursday evening was very clear allowing me the opportunity to catch the ISS as this picture shows. As the ISS appeared over the western horizon a passenger jet flew over on its way to MCI Airport. I was using a remote for the camera and was regularly hitting the shutter release button planning on catching the plane as it went past Orion’s Belt. Somehow I didn’t depress the button enough creating the gap over the belt stars. Nonetheless the path the ISS followed took it below Orion’s feet past Sirius in Canis Major, and then close by Procyon in Canis Minor and eventually across Leo the Lion.
   Last night, Friday, it was overcast so no picture.
   Camera Info: Canon Rebel EOS T7i; 18mm; ISO 1600; f/4.0; 3 sec.
   Software for Image Stacking (PC version): Sequator. Here is a good explanation about using Sequator.

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.


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Two ISS Midwest Flyovers

   Approximately every 90 minutes the International Space Station (ISS) completes an orbit around the Earth. At the correct times, around sunset and sunrise, the large solar panels on the ISS reflect sunlight downward toward the Earth’s surface. Depending on the orientation of the solar panels and where you are you may be able to see the reflected sunlight off the solar panels. To the naked eye the ISS may appear as bright as Venus, around a -4 apparent magnitude.
   This evening, March 21st and tomorrow evening the 22nd the ISS will be visible, weather permitting, as it passes over the midwest United States. Use the links below to see visibility opportunities for your location.


   The ISS travels in excess of 17,000 miles per hour and it takes maybe 6 minutes or so to cross the United States from west to east.

   Two excellent websites for ISS viewing information are below. You will need to input your location information at both sites.

   ISS Sightings
   At the NASA web site you will get a list of the next several dates and times for viewing the ISS that includes it’s rising and setting times and directions of travel (always west to east), and some other information. Pay attention to the maximum altitude and length of time above the horizon.

   Heavens Above
   The Heavens Above website provides a list of viewing opportunities like the NASA web site but in addition you may see a star map showing the ISS path across the starry sky. You will find that this web site has quite a lot to offer with viewing information ranging from the ISS to Iridium satellites and other satellites, planet information, and so on. Well worth bookmarking.

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.


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Waning Gibbous Moon Passes Spica

   Over the next 2 days, March 21st and 22nd, the waning gibbous Moon will be passing by the blue-white star Spica in the constellation Virgo the Harvest Maiden, coming within 6-7o on the 21st and 10-11o on the 22nd.
   From the mythology about Virgo she is often depicted with a bundle of grasses, like wheat, clutched in her left hand. The star Spica represents that bundle.


   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.


Also Follow me and other great resources at Feedspot.