Uranus Sees Red!


   Sunday February 26th the ‘Red Planet’ Mars will be about 0.5o from the outer planet Uranus. Mars has an apparent magnitude of 1.28 while the much larger but considerably more distant Uranus has an apparent magnitude of 5.88. Despite the large difference in magnitudes both planets should be visible as small dot shapes in binoculars and with even more detail through a telescope eyepiece.

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.

ISS Last Night

   Last evening was my first opportunity to see the ISS in at least a month so I quickly set up my camera aiming it toward Venus and Mars. However my aim was off by quite a bit so I hurriedly readjusted the camera, 3 times, to capture these pictures. All were taken with ISO 800; F5; 18mm; 2.5 second. Pictures were stacked, merged, using Starstax.

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.

Moon Cruises Past Planets and Stars

feb5-bino
   Over the next several evenings the Moon, as it orbits toward the east and waxes from crescent to first quarter phase will pass by several planets, dwarf planets, and star clusters. On the evening of February 5th the Moon will be close to the reddish star Aldebaran, the ‘eye’ in the face of the angry bull, Taurus. This should make for a nice view with binoculars or low power eyepiece when the Moon will sort of overlay the stars of the open star cluster the Hyades.

   These two animated graphics show the sky as viewed from Quito Ecuador at 0o latitude, and my home latitude of approximately 40o North. They show the sky at one day intervals starting with February 1st and ending with February 5th.


   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.

Moon Conjunction with Mars and Venus

31jan-bino   Wednesday February 1st the 4-day old waxing crescent Moon will be near the planets Mars and Venus as this simulated view with 10×50 binoculars shows.

   These two graphics show the sky as viewed from Quito Ecuador at 0o latitude, and my home latitude of approximately 40o North. 


   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.

Mars and Uranus at Heliocentric Conjunction

   Greetings from San Carlos de Bariloche, Argentina. For the next 3 weeks I will be posting with the perspective of viewing the sky from between around 42o-48o south latitude, and then from the equator while in Quito Ecuador.

   On the evening of January 13th both planets, Mars (23o) and Uranus (23o), will be at about the same heliocentric longitude or at heliocentric conjunction. While they may share nearly identical heliocentric longitude coordinates they do not have the same right ascension with Uranus about 2 hours of R.A. west from Mars. Both Mars and Uranus are visible over the southwestern horizon a couple of hours after sunset, although it may prove to be difficult to see Uranus with an apparent magnitude of nearly 6.0.

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.

Moon Moons Uranus

   Thursday January 5th the just past first quarter Moon, a waxing gibbous Moon, is close to the outer planet Uranus, and also two of the Dwarf Planets. But close only in the sense that the three are in the same direction, or line of sight. Uranus as the next-to-last outermost of the 8 planets is 19.8 Au and has an apparent magnitude of 5.8. Ceres and Eris, while both are Dwarf Planets, are at very nearly the opposite ends of the solar system. Ceres is within the asteroid belts at a distance of 2.5 AU and has an apparent magnitude of 7.64. Eris, on the other hand is 96 AU from the Earth and has an apparent magnitude of 18.6.

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.

Mars and Neptune Conjunction, inlcuding the Moon and Venus


   A previous post described the daily motion of Mars as it moves toward the planet Neptune. Well Monday evening January 2nd the planets Mars and Neptune, and our Moon (a 5-day old waxing crescent Moon) will all fit within the field of view of binoculars with Mars and Neptune separated by about 1.5o.

   In that post I had also mentioned that were Neptune observed from the surface of Mars then Neptune would be starting its retrograde motion. Actually I was not entirely correct as I was basing this on how the two planets looked from Earth rather than Neptune as seen from Mars. Compare the distance between the Earth and Mars and the difference between the orbital speed of the two planets. Then consider Mars and Neptune where there is a greater difference between the orbital speeds of Mars and Neptune as well as the distance between the Mars and Neptune then there is between the Earth and Mars.

   What this means is that Neptune, as viewed from Mars, will not actually begin to retrograde until around the middle of June.

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.