Moon – Saturn Conjunction, and ISS

   Thursday morning February 20th the 26-day old waning crescent Moon will be about 1-2o from the ringed planet Saturn. Both rise about 2 hours before sunrise local time, and both will easily fit within the field of view of binoculars.

   Adding to viewing the Moon-Saturn conjunction, and nearby Jupiter and Mars will be a fly-by of the International Space Station (ISS) between 6:22 am MST and 6:29 MST. Check viewing opportunities at the Heavens Above web site or NASA’s ISS Sightings web site.
   This star chart from the Heavens Above web site is set for the latitude and longitude of Phoenix Arizona.

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.


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February Moon at Descending Node


   Wednesday morning February 19th the waning crescent Moon crosses the plane of the ecliptic moving south. This is known as the descending node, one of two intersections the Moon’s orbital path (dark green line) has with the ecliptic.

   On the date of the descending node the 26-day old thin waning crescent Moon will be about 1-2o to the west from the outer ringed planet Jupiter. Both rise within an hour of local time for sunrise.

   
   
   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.


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Moon – Antares Conjunction

   Sunday morning February 16th the 23-day old waning gibbous Moon is about 8o from the reddish star Antares, the heart of Scorpius the Scorpion. Both rise after midnight and are over the southern horizon at sunrise.

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.


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Virgo Grabs for the Moon!


   Thursday morning January 13th the 20-day old waning gibbous Moon will be 6-7o from the blue-white star Spica in Virgo the Harvest Maiden.

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.


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Full Moon – Regulus Conjunction

   Sunday February 9th the full Moon will be about 2-3o from the star Regulus in the constellation Leo the Lion as they both rise early in the evening, and make their way across the sky.

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.


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Taurus Head-Butts the Moon!

   Monday evening February 3rd the 10-day old waxing gibbous Moon will be about 3-4o from the reddish star Aldebaran in Taurus the Bull. Aldebaran, in mythology, represents the ‘angry eye’ of the Bull. Aldebaran is also the brightest star in the v-shaped Hyades open star cluster. Nearby is another open star cluster, the Pleiades, most observable as a small dipper-shape grouping of stars.

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.


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The Inner and Outer Solar System

   Friday evening January 31st there is an opportunity to see or at least visualize the inner and outer areas of our solar system. About an hour or so after local sunset look toward the western horizon for the brightly shining inner planet Venus with a -4.0 apparent magnitude. Nearby, about 5o west from Venus, is the outermost of the 8 planets, Neptune. However with an apparent magnitude of 7.94 Neptune would only be visible with an optical aid – the larger the better.
   Look further east and higher for the 7-day old waxing crescent Moon to be between the outer planet Uranus and the Dwarf Planet Eris. About 9o below the Moon is the Dwarf Planet Eris with an apparent magnitude of 18.60 – definitely not naked-eye visible. Above the Moon by about 5o is the outer planet Uranus, just barely visible to the naked-eye with an apparent magnitude of 5.80.

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.


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