Mars and the 7 Sisters

   The planet Mars has been steadily orbiting eastward and is currently moving past the open star cluster the Pleiades. On Wednesday evening March 3rd Mars will be at its closest to the Pleiades coming within about 3-4o from the open star cluster as it passes by.

   Use binoculars or a low-power telescope eyepiece to view Mars and the Pleiades.
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.

Inner Meets Outers – In A Triple Conjunction

   Sunday morning February 28th the innermost planet, Mercury, and two of the ringed outer planets, Jupiter and Saturn, will be in a triple conjunction as Mercury moves eastward past Saturn and then Jupiter. Mercury will be about 3-4o from Saturn and about 2-3o from Jupiter.
   All three will almost fit within the field of view of binoculars and should make for an interesting contrast in apparent magnitudes however Jupiter (-1.97) far outshines Mercury (0.30) and Saturn (0.71).

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.

Moon on the Move – Always


   Over the next few evenings the waxing gibbous Moon will move eastward passing by the open star cluster known as the Beehive Cluster this evening and then in a couple of days, as a full Moon, will be close to the heart of Leo the Lion the star Regulus.
   While the Moon may be close to the open star cluster the waxing gibbous Moon with its considerably greater apparent magnitude will outshine the star cluster making it not visible. Wait a few days and then aim your binoculars or low power eyepiece for a better view.

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.

Moon Meets the Twins


   Tuesday evening February 23rd the 12-day old waxing gibbous Moon will be about 2o from Pollux, one of the two ‘Twin’ stars of the constellation Gemini the Twins. The other brother is Castor, which is about 6o away from the Moon.

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.

February Moon at Ascending Node

   Saturday February 20th the 9-day old waxing gibbous Moon will be crossing the plane of the ecliptic moving north. This is known as the ascending node, one of two intersections the Moon’s orbital path has with the ecliptic. The ecliptic is actually the Earth’s orbit, and the Moon’s orbit is inclined about 6o from the ecliptic. So there are two node intersections, the ascending and descending nodes.

   On the day of the node crossing the 9-day old waxing gibbous Moon will be over the southwestern horizon later during the evening after sunset local time. Watch for the Moon to be about 8o from the reddish star Aldebaran in the open star cluster the Hyades in Taurus the Bull.

   Does our Moon actually go around the Earth as many graphics show? From our perspective on the Earth the Moon appears to circle around the Earth. However, in reality, the Moon orbits the Sun together with the Earth*
*Click here to read my Scope on the Sky column “The Real Shape of the Moon’s Orbit”. (PDF)
   
   
   
   
   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.

Mercury – Saturn – Jupiter Together Again!

   Saturday morning February 20th in the hour or so before the Sun rises look for the innermost planet Mercury to be about 4-5o from Saturn and Jupiter. All three should fit within the field of view of binoculars, but the three planets will be low above the horizon.

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.

The Moon, Mars, and NASA’s Perseverance

   Thursday evening February 18th the 7-day old almost first quarter but still waxing crescent Moon will be about 3o from the ‘Red Planet’ Mars. Despite the -11.75 apparent magnitude of the Moon Mars, with an apparent magnitude of 0.75, will still be visible.

   
   NASA Perseverance is scheduled to land on Mars on 18 February 2021, at around 20 UT or 2 pm CST.

   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.


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Moon – Uranus Conjunction

   Wednesday evening February 17th the 6-day old waxing crescent Moon will be about 3-4o from the outer and ringed Planet Uranus. While the Moon with an apparent magnitude of -11.5 will certainly be visible, Uranus with an apparent magnitude of 5.81 will not!

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.


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Crescent Moon – Neptune Conjunction

   Saturday February 13th the 2-day old thin waxing crescent Moon will be about 2-3o from the outer planet Neptune and about 6-7o to the west from Dwarf Planet Ceres. The Moon will pass by Ceres over the next 24 hours and by about this time tomorrow the Moon will be to the east from Ceres.
   I should point out that Ceres with an apparent magnitude between 8th and 9th and Neptune with an apparent magnitude between 7th and 8th neither will be visible to the unaided eye.
   However when you are looking toward the Moon you will be looking in the direction of these two distant members of our solar system. This graphic shows the position of the Earth, our Moon, Ceres, and Neptune on February 13th. From this perspective objects to the left of the Sun will be seen in the evening skies as the Earth rotates.

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.


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February Moon at Perigee & Spica Conjunction

   Our Moon reaches perigee, (closest to Earth), for this orbit, on Wednesday February 3rd. At that time the Moon will be at a distance of 28.8 Earth diameters, 229,986 miles (370,127 km) from the Earth.

   Before sunrise on the date of the perigee Moon the 20.4-day old waning gibbous Moon and will be about 7-8o from the star Spica in Virgo the Harvest Maiden.

   Does our Moon actually go around the Earth as this graphic shows? From our perspective on the Earth the Moon appears to circle around the Earth. However, in reality, the Moon orbits the Sun together with the Earth*
   *Click here to read my Scope on the Sky column “The Real Shape of the Moon’s Orbit”. (PDF)

   
   
   
   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to go to bobs-spaces.


Also Follow me and other great resources at Feedspot.