October Moon at Apogee

   Our Moon reaches apogee, (furthest from Earth), for this orbit, on Saturday October 3rd. For this apogee the 16-day old waning gibbous Moon will be at a distance of 31.85 Earth diameters, 252,463 miles (406,300 km) from the Earth.


   On the date of the apogee the 16-day old waning gibbous Moon will be about 1-2o to the east from the planet Mars and both very visible through the night hours, and shining brightly over the western horizon at sunrise.

   Our Moon and Mars should make for an interesting view with binoculars but considering the difference in apparent brightness (Moon: -12.6 vs Mars: -2.52) the Moon’s reflected sunlight will ‘drown out’ Mars. On the other hand, or direction, Venus is still close to the ‘heart of the Lion’ the star Regulus. Venus is unmistakable with an apparent magnitude -4.07 of compared to the 1.34 apparent magnitude of Regulus.


   Does our Moon actually go around the Earth as this graphic shows? From our perspective on the Earth the Moon appears to circle around the Earth. However, in reality, the Moon orbits the Sun together with the Earth*
   *Click here to read my 2006 Scope on the Sky column “The Real Shape of the Moon’s Orbit”. (PDF)

   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to go to bobs-spaces.


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September Apogee Moon

   Our Moon reaches apogee, (furthest from Earth), for this orbit, on Sunday September 6th. For this apogee the 19-day old waning gibbous Moon will be at a distance of 31.79 Earth diameters, 252,031 miles (405,606 km) from the Earth.

   On the date of the apogee the 19-day old waning gibbous Moon will be about 5o to the east from the planet Mars and both very visible through the night hours. Not visible to the naked-eye because of the bright Moonshine is the outer planet Uranus with a 5.8 apparent magnitude about 2-3o from the Moon.

   Does our Moon actually go around the Earth as this graphic shows? From our perspective on the Earth the Moon appears to circle around the Earth. However, in reality, the Moon orbits the Sun together with the Earth*
   *Click here to read my 2006 Scope on the Sky column “The Real Shape of the Moon’s Orbit”. (PDF)

   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to go to bobs-spaces.


Also Follow me and other great resources at Feedspot.

August Moon at Apogee

   Our Moon reaches apogee, (furthest from Earth), for this orbit, on Sunday August 9th. At that time the last quarter Moon will be at a distance of 31.72 Earth diameters, 251,469 miles (404,700 km) from the Earth.

   On the date of the apogee the 19-day old waning gibbous Moon will be about 1o from the planet Mars and both very visible over the southern horizon in the hours before sunrise.

   Does our Moon actually go around the Earth as this graphic shows? From our perspective on the Earth the Moon appears to circle around the Earth. However, in reality, the Moon orbits the Sun together with the Earth*
   *Click here to read my 2006 Scope on the Sky column “The Real Shape of the Moon’s Orbit”. (PDF)

   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to go to bobs-spaces.


Also Follow me and other great resources at Feedspot.

An ‘Old’ April Moon at Apogee

   Our Moon reaches apogee, (greatest distance from Earth), for this orbit, on Monday April 20th. At that time the new Moon will be at a distance of 31.86 Earth diameters 252,563 miles (406,641 km) from the Earth.

   On the day of the apogee Moon the 27.2-day old thin waning crescent Moon will be rising about 1 hour before the Sun rises and if spotted could become a personal record for seeing an ‘old’ Moon.

   While out looking for the Moon there are several planets arranged across the southern and southeastern horizon. They are arranged west to east (or east to west) along the ecliptic, the Earth’s orbital path around the Sun, as the two graphics below are showing.

   Does our Moon actually go around the Earth as this graphic shows? From our perspective on the Earth the Moon appears to circle around the Earth. However, in reality, the Moon orbits the Sun together with the Earth*

   *Click here to read my 2006 Scope on the Sky column “The Real Shape of the Moon’s Orbit” in NSTA’s Science Scope Magazine.

   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to go to bobs-spaces.


Also Follow me and other great resources at Feedspot.

January Moon at 2nd Apogee

   Our Moon reaches apogee, (greatest distance from Earth), for this orbit, on Wednesday January 29th. At that time the Moon will be at a distance of 31.78 Earth diameters 251,899 miles (405,393 km) from the Earth.

   On the day of the apogee Moon the 5-day old waxing crescent Moon rises around mid-morning and sets before midnight. At around sunset the Moon will over the southwestern horizon with Venus shining brightly lower and closer to the horizon.

   Does our Moon actually go around the Earth as this graphic shows? From our perspective on the Earth the Moon appears to circle around the Earth. However, in reality, the Moon orbits the Sun together with the Earth*

   *Click here to read my 2006 Scope on the Sky column “The Real Shape of the Moon’s Orbit”. (PDF)

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to go to bobs-spaces.


Also Follow me and other great resources at Feedspot.

December Moon at Perigee

   Our Moon reaches perigee, (closest distance to Earth), for this orbit, on Wednesday December 18th. At that time the Moon will be at a distance of 26.025 Earth diameters, 230,069 miles (370,260 km) from the Earth.

   On the day of the perigee Moon the 22-day old waning gibbous Moon will be over the south-southwestern horizon at sunrise local time. The planet Mars is also visible over the southeastern horizon. If your local eastern horizon is low enough then the innermost planet, Mercury, might be seen near the reddish star Antares in Scorpius the Scorpion.

   Does our Moon actually go around the Earth as this graphic shows? From our perspective on the Earth the Moon appears to circle around the Earth. However, in reality, the Moon orbits the Sun together with the Earth*
   *Click here to read my 2006 Scope on the Sky column “The Real Shape of the Moon’s Orbit”. (PDF)

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to go to bobs-spaces.


Also Follow me and other great resources at Feedspot.