Waxing Crescent Moon Near the Beehive Open Star Cluster


   Monday evening May 29th the 5-day old waxing crescent Moon will be within 3-4o from the open star cluster M-44, or as it probably more known as the “Beehive Cluster”, or from Latin, Praesepe, meaning “manger”.
   Both of which fit easily within the field of view of binoculars.

   This open star cluster, as a group, has a 3rd-4th apparent magnitude and to the naked eye appears as a fuzzy patch of light in Cancer the Crab. M-44 is near the 4th magnitude star Asellus Australis, the star that marks the splitting point for the Y-shaped star pattern.

   
   
   
   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.

Moon Not at Ascending Node!!

   Whoops — writing perhaps a little too early this morning I sent out a mis-dated (as in incorrect) posting about the Moon being at ascending node. It is not there today but rather on the 31st. I’ll re-post in a couple of days.
   However the sky graphic is correct so if it is clear this evening go outside and enjoy the view. Use binoculars and you could see the open star cluster, M-35, a few degrees to the right from the Moon.

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.

May Moon At Perigee


   The Moon reaches perigee, (minimum distance from Earth), this month on Friday May 26th. At that time the Moon will more or less be at a distance of 28.0 Earth diameters (357,207 km or 221,958 miles) from the Earth.

   Does our Moon actually go around the Earth as this graphic shows? From our perspective on the Earth the Moon appears to circle around the Earth. However, in reality, the Moon orbits the Sun together with the Earth*


   On the day of the perigee Moon the 1.25-day young thin waxing crescent Moon is above the western horizon at sunset local time and is near the planet Mars.

   *Click here to read my 2006 Scope on the Sky column “The Real Shape of the Moon’s Orbit”. (PDF)

   Read this very informative article about the Earth-Moon system and their orbital motions, written by Joe Hanson. “Do We Orbit the Moon?”

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to go to bobs-spaces.

Don’t Panic, It’s Only A Towel!


   Thursday May 25th, or any day that is May 25th we celebrate, in our own way, (yes we do) the Book,
Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy
, by Douglas Adams. What is the significance of the towel? Click on the graphic to enlarge it to a readable size to find out.
   So be a hoopy frood and click on this link to visit the Towel Day web site.

   Overheard on Jeopardy: “42.”
And the answer is: “What is the meaning of life?”
   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.

They’re There!


   Tuesday morning, May 23rd the thin 26.7-day old waning crescent Moon will be surrounded by planets, most of which will be difficult to see given the time of day and how faint each one is. Except for Venus.

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.

Moon-Venus Conjunction

   Monday morning May 22nd the 25.6-day old waning crescent Moon will be within about 3o from the inner planet Venus. Both of which will fit nicely within the field of view of binoculars.

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.

Sun Does Not Enter Gemini

  According to the pseudoscience of astrology the Sun enters the constellation of the Gemini Twins on Saturday May 20th. When in fact the actual position of the Sun on this date is still within the boundary of the constellation of Taurus the Bull, as this graphic and the banner graphic show.

   Read a little more about how astrology has the Sun incorrectly placed in a previous blog, and in another blog discussing the effects of precession.

   
   
   

Click here to go to the Qué tal in the Current Skies web site for monthly observing information, or here to return to bobs-spaces.